Christmas from the Wise Men’s Point of View: The Apocryphal Revelation of the Magi - Brent Landau lecture Nov. 29 https://t.co/Y7LCVlk1fC
Where young evangelicals are headed – @ayjay https://t.co/mT0Yqfo2tO
Roy Moore and the confused identity of today’s “evangelical” voter https://t.co/u8pviYyoxR Thomas Kidd via @voxdotcom
Evangelical Preaching in North America in the Late Twentieth Century - David Bebbington https://t.co/xusfZMgpmm
Not All Turkey and Touchdowns https://t.co/VjgvSSGYvd Thomas Kidd, @TGC #Thanksgiving
A Lost Century, and a Slipped Date https://t.co/THlyi0Qcw1 Philip Jenkins via @anxious_bench @PatheosEvang
State Department Fails to Meet Deadline for "Countries of Particular Concern" Designations https://t.co/JpetGoH4mo @USCIRF
Faith and the Challenges of Secularism: A Jewish-Christian-Muslim Trialogue @McCormickProf https://t.co/7AnfZL2Kn1
What’s behind the New Testament? https://t.co/y8SEzJY9wG @jonestony via @ChristianCent
Houses of Parliament to be lit up in red for persecuted Christians | @CatholicHerald https://t.co/QEMlG64T1K h/t… https://t.co/LnfyZ9b9ss

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Martin, David

Non-Resident Senior Fellow, Sociology of Religion
London School of Economics & Political Science

David Martin, a sociologist of religion known especially for his critique of secularization as a theory of social process and his pioneering work on Pentecostalism in Latin America, is a professor emeritus of sociology at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), honorary professor of the sociology of religion at Lancaster University, and Ordinary Fellow of the British Academy Fellowship. He is also an ordained priest in the Church of England attached as a non-stipendiary assistant to Guildford Cathedral. A past president of the Science and Religion Forum, the Religion Section of the British Sociological Association, the International Conference for the Sociology of Religion, and the United Kingdom Committee for University Autonomy, he has been a member of the boards of directors of CORAT (Christian Organizations Research and Advisory Trust), St. Catharine’s Royal Foundation, Culham College, the Higher Education Foundation, and the International Council for the Future of the University.


McClay, Wilfred

Non-Resident Scholar, History
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
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Wilfred McClay Vitae

Wilfred M. McClay has been SunTrust Bank Chair of Excellence in Humanities at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, where he has also been a Professor of History since 1999. He has also taught at Georgetown University, Tulane University, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Dallas, and is currently a Senior Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC, a Senior Fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington, DC, and a member of the Society of Scholars at the James Madison Program of Princeton University. He was appointed in 2002 to the National Council on the Humanities, the advisory board for the National Endowment for the Humanities.


McDermott, Gerald R.

ISR Distinguished Senior Fellow, History of Christianitymcdermott_gerald8

Anglican Chair of Divinity
History and Doctrine

Email Gerald McDermottHomepagePublications

Gerald R. McDermott joined the Beeson Divinity school faculty in 2015. He is the author of Can Evangelicals Learn from World Religions?, World Religions: An Indispensable Introduction, God’s Rivals: Why Has God Allowed Different Religions?, Cancer: A Medical and Spiritual Guide for Patients and their Families, and The Theology of Jonathan Edwards. His academic research focus has been two-fold: Jonathan Edwards and Christian understandings of other religions. As a renowned Edwards scholar, McDermott has produced six books on Edwards, and his Theology of Jonathan Edwards (coauthored with Michael McClymond) won Christianity Today’s 2013 award for Top Book in Theology/Ethics. In total, McDermott has written, co-written, or edited more than eighteen books and scores of articles. Before coming to Beeson, he was the Jordan-Trexler Professor of Religion at Roanoke College since 2008 and on faculty since 1989. He is an Anglican priest, and is married to Jean. Together they have three sons and nine grandchildren.


McKechnie, Paul

Non-Resident Scholar
Macquarie University, Australia
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Paul McKechnie Vitae

Paul McKechnie gained degrees from the Universities of Cambridge and Oxford. He taught Classics and Ancient History in the University of Auckland for sixteen years before joining the Centre of Research Excellence in Ancient Cultures (Department of Ancient History) at Macquarie University in 2007.

His principal research interest is in early Christianity from the New Testament period to Constantine.  He also studies Ptolemaic Egypt. 


Meador, Keith

Non-Resident Scholar – Health & Spirituality
Vanderbilt University-Center for Biomedical Ethics and Study
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Curriculum Vitae
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Keith G. Meador, MD, ThM, MPH, is Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Professor of Health Policy at Vanderbilt University. He also serves as the Director of the Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society and on the Associate Faculty of the Graduate Department of Religion at Vanderbilt. He is the Director of Mental Health and Chaplaincy through the VISN 6 MIRECC as part of a national initiative to foster integration of chaplaincy services into mental health care within the Department of Veterans Affairs. He joined the faculty at Vanderbilt in July of 2010 and previously served as Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University where he gave direction to centers in the Medical Center and Divinity School focused on the intersections of religion, theology, and health. He is a physician and board certified psychiatrist with training in geriatric psychiatry, theology, and public health. Dr. Meador is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Vanderbilt University and received his medical degree from the University of Louisville. He completed his residency in psychiatry and fellowship in geriatric psychiatry at Duke University. His theological education leading to the ThM was at Duke Divinity School and he received his MPH in Epidemiology from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill.
His scholarship builds on his clinical, research and teaching background in mental health, practical theology, and public health about which he lectures widely and has published numerous publications including the co-authored book, Heal Thyself: Spirituality, Medicine, and the Distortion of Christianity. His academic work includes theological and conceptual exploration of the intersections of religion and health and empirical research regarding socio-cultural determinants of illness, health and human flourishing.

 


Mencken, F. Carson

Resident Scholar – Criminology
Baylor University
Email Carson Mencken
F. Carson Mencken Vitae
Publications

F. Carson Mencken is professor and chair of sociology, Graduate Program Director, and Director of the Baylor Religion Survey. He received his BS degree summa cum laude from the College of Charleston (SC) in 1987, and his Ph.D. from Louisiana State University in 1994. His areas of research expertise include civic engagement, religiosity, and research methods. Recently, with Dr. Charles Tolbert he has been examining the impact of changes in the banking industry on the availability of capital for local businesses and entrepreneurs in rural America. This research has been funded by two competitive grants from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. He has authored over 40 professional publications. He has received competitive grant funding for his research from such sources as the Tennessee Valley Authority, the United States Department of the Interior, the United States Department of Justice, and the John Templeton Foundation.

He and his family are actively involved with the Dayspring Baptist Church of Waco.


Mittleman, Alan

Non-Resident Scholar
The Jewish Theological Seminary
Alan Mittleman Vitae
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Alan Mittleman is  the Aaron Rabinowitz and Simon H. Rifkind Professor of Jewish Philosophy at the Jewish Theological Seminary. He is the author, most recently, of Human Nature and Jewish Thought: Judaism’s Case for Why Persons Matter (Princeton University Press, 2015). His current project, also for Princeton University Press, is Holiness and Violence in Judaism: A Philosophical Investigation.
Dr. Mittleman is the author of five other books: Between Kant and Kabbalah (SUNY Press, 1990), The Politics of Torah (SUNY Press, 1996), The Scepter Shall Not Depart From Judah (Lexington Books, 2000) Hope in a Democratic Age (Oxford University Press, 2009) and A Short History of Jewish Ethics (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012). He is also the editor of Uneasy Allies: Evangelical and Jewish Relations (Lexington Books, 2007), Jewish Polity and American Civil Society (Rowman & Littlefield, 2002), Jews and the American Public Square (Rowman & Littlefield, 2002), and Religion as a Public Good (Rowman & Littlefield, 2003). He is currently editing Holiness in Jewish Thought (Oxford University Press, forthcoming). His many articles, essays, and reviews have appeared in such journals as Harvard Theological Review, Modern Judaism, the Jewish Political Studies Review, the Journal of Religion, and First Things. He is a contributor to The Cambridge Companion to American Judaism.


Moaddel, Mansoor

Non-Resident Scholar, Middle East
University of Maryland-College Park
Mansoor Moaddel Vitae
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Dr. Moaddel is Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology, and Research Professor, National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Response to Terrorism, University of Maryland, College Park.  He  studies culture, ideology, political conflict, revolution and social change.

Dr. Moaddel studies culture, ideology, political conflict, revolution and social change. His work focuses on the causes and consequences of values and attitudes of the people from the Middle East and North Africa. He has carried out values surveys in Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, and Turkey. His previous research project analyzed the determinants of ideological production in the Islamic world, in which he studied the rise of Islamic modernism in Egypt, India, and Iran in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; liberal nationalism in Egypt, anti-clerical secularism in Iran, liberal Arabism and Pan-Arab nationalism in Syria and Iraq in the first half of twentieth century; and Islamic fundamentalism in Algeria, Egypt, Iran, Jordan, and Syria in the second half of the twentieth century. His fields of research and teaching interests are values survey, sociology of ideology, sociology of religion, political conflict and revolution, terrorism and political violence, and Islam and the Middle East and North Africa. He is currently involved in a panel study of changes in values and political engagement in Egypt, Tunisia, and Turkey. For more information, see www.mevs.org.

 


Mooney, Margarita A.

Non-Resident Scholar, Religion
Yale University
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Margarita A. Mooney Vitae
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After spending six years on the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, in July 2013, Dr. Mooney joined the Department of Sociology at Yale University as an Associate Research Scientist. As part of a funded research grant from the John Templeton Foundation, she recently interviewed young adults in 10 different states across the U.S. who have undergone traumatic life events. Through their personal narratives, she explored the importance of relationships and communities to fostering human flourishing following traumatic events. She is interested in the types of cultural narratives and social structures that empower people who suffer to nonetheless to realize their freedom in accord with human dignity.

Margarita A. Mooney is  a Faculty Fellow in the Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina. She received her Ph.D. in Sociology from Princeton University in 2005, and her M.A. in Sociology from Princeton in 2000, with her B.A. in Psychology from Yale University in 1995. In addition to numerous scholarly articles, her book, Faith Makes Us Live: Surviving and Thriving in the Haitian Diaspora, was published in 2009 by the University of California Press.


Murray, Sarah-Jane

Resident Scholarsj_murray
Baylor University
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Sarah-Jane was born in Ireland and educated in France before venturing across the pond to get her BA in French and Philosophy from Auburn University. Then she received the Ecole Normale Supérieure-Lettres et Sciences Humaines diploma in French and Linguistics, followed by a PhD from Princeton University in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures. Sarah-jane also joins an impressive list of successful screenwriters as an alumna of the UCLA professional program in screenwriting and studied under chairman Richard Walter.

Sarah-Jane’s academic research focuses on the power of story. In her first book, From Plato to Lancelot (Syracuse UP, 2009), she explored the merging of Celtic and classical traditions of storytelling in early medieval French literature. In 2007, she was invited to present a distinguished lecture in Paris and became a permanent member of the Centre for Medieval Studies at the Sorbonne Nouvelle (CEMA). She is also the recipient of grants from the American Philosophical Society and the National Endowment for the humanities. In 2011, the NEH awarded her a $210,000 grant for the first English translation of the  Old French Moralized Ovid In Verse, to be published by Baylor University Press.


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