George Whitefield’s Gospel-Centered Hymn Book | Thomas Kidd at @TGC https://t.co/zB2u47TWgA
Andrew Chesnut on Santa Muerte @RoRcast https://t.co/QJH1522SW7
Alternative Scriptures: Melville's "Lost Gnostic Poem" https://t.co/iVGtfaVjrU Philip Jenkins, @anxious_bench
Israel and the Role of Place in Christian Faith | Thomas Kidd @TGC https://t.co/kxbfgfLj1C
'Benjamin Franklin' takes a more nuanced look at Franklin's views of God https://t.co/TmSj5rX19p @csmonitor reviews Thomas Kidd's biography
The many resurrections of Chinese Christianity - Philip Jenkins @ChristianCent https://t.co/XXvKByoVkX
Maximum Security Seminary https://t.co/lruIJPvrq2 @TGC cites ISR research on prison seminaries
Critical Mass - @TexasMonthly quotes ISR's Gordon Melton https://t.co/ok4y7a5TTl
George Whitefield’s Gospel-Centered Hymn Book https://t.co/XCW5Y9l9Ny Thomas Kidd via @tgc
The Distinct, Positive Impact of a Good Dad - The Atlantic https://t.co/tdEenDeiDB #FathersDay @WilcoxNMP

C

Carnes, Natalie

ISR Faculty Fellow
219794
Baylor University
Department of Religion
Natalie Carnes Vitae

Natalie Carnes is Assistant Professor of Theology in the Baylor Religion Department. Her theological journey began at Harvard (A.B.) and continued into graduate studies at the University of Chicago (M.A.) and Duke (Ph.D.).

As a systematic theologian, Natalie reflects on traditional doctrines through slightly less traditional themes. Her first book, Beauty: A Theological Engagement with Gregory of Nyssa (Cascade Books, 2014), traces the arc of systematic theology through a field of questions about beauty. The puzzles of this book inspired the next—her current book project Image and Presence: A Christological Reflection on Iconoclasm and Iconophilia. In it, Natalie argues for understanding iconoclasm as internal to imaging by reflecting on Christ as the Image of the Invisible God. She has published in journals including Modern Theology, Journal of Religion, and Pro Ecclesia on these themes as well as those related to religious authority, theological knowledge, and her third, nascent book project: an attempt to open the conversations of theological anthropology to include reflection on children. She hopes to make some headway on all of this as a 2015-16 Louisville Institute sabbatical grantee.


Clark, William R.

Non-Resident Scholar, World Politics – International RelationsClark-200
Charles Puryear Professor of Liberal Arts
Department of Political Science, Texas A&M University
Email William Clark
William Clark Vitae
Homepage

Dr. Clark is Head of the Department of Political Science and is a research fellow at the Institute for the Studies of Religion at Baylor University. His research focus is on comparative and international political economy with an emphasis on the politics of macroeconomic policy in open economy settings.

Past research projects have addressed the way monetary institutions (central bank independence and exchange rate regimes) influence the ability of incumbent leaders to use macroeconomic policy for electoral purposes.  He has also contributed to the literature on comparative party systems.  In addition, Professor Clark has published papers on the statistical testing of conditional hypotheses.

Professor Clark is also interested in the political economy of development and the political economy of religion.  Work in the former area includes current projects on the political resource curse, and the economic performance of authoritarian governments and the effect of historical protestant missionary flows on economic growth.  He is also conducting research that explains why some protestant denominations in the United States are growing while others have been in decline for decades.  Professor Clark is in the early stages of a project on the effect of globalization on income inequality.

Professor Clark is the author of Capitalism, Not Globalism and, with Matt and Sona Golder, Principles of Comparative Politics.  He has published in a variety of journals including American Political Science Review, International Organization, Comparative Political Studies, Political Analysis, and Economics & Politics.

 


Clifton, Jon

Jon_Clifton_HighResNon-Resident Senior Fellow
Gallup Organization
Managing Partner
Email Jon Clifton

Jon Clifton is a Managing Partner at Gallup and a member of the company’s Executive Committee. He is responsible for the company’s global government work and the Gallup World Poll, an ongoing study conducted in more than 160 countries. He is also a member of the Public Release Committee, the governance board that oversees and maintains Gallup’s public release standards for data, research and methodology.

Jon is a nonresident Senior Fellow at Baylor University’s Institute for Studies of Religion, and he serves on the board of directors of the Meridian International Center and of StreetWise Partners. He received a bachelor’s degree in political science and history from the University of Michigan and a J.D. in international law from the University of Nebraska. He lives and works in Washington, D.C.
Clifton StrengthsFinder Top Five: Competition | Self-Assurance | Achiever | Relator | Command

 

 


Coffman, Elesha J.

Resident Scholar, History of Christianity
Baylor University
Email Elesha Coffman
Elesha Coffman vitae

Blog posts at Religion in American History

Elesha Coffman joined Baylor faculty as assistant professor of history in 2016. Previously, she was the assistant professor of church history at the University of Dubuque Theological Seminary.

She earned a B.A. at Wheaton College (IL) and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees at Duke University. She also spent a year as a fellow at the Center for the Study of Religion at Princeton University. Prior to graduate school, she worked at Christianity Today International as managing editor of Christian History magazine.

Dr. Coffman writes on religion and media in American culture. She has published articles in American Catholic Studies and Religion and American Culture and has presented numerous papers at the American Academy of Religion and American Society of Church History annual meetings. Her first book, The Christian Century and the Rise of the Protestant Mainline (Oxford, 2013), narrates the history of the magazine and its role in establishing the tradition that would come, in 1960, to be called the mainline.  She is beginning a research project on the spiritual life of Margaret Mead.


Colón, Carlos

carlos 2016Resident Scholar
Carlos Colon’ Vitae
Email Carlos Colón

Carlos Colón is a composer, liturgist, and cultural promoter, specializing in music that is both academically serious and ecclesiastically valuable. His recent projects lie at the intersection of social justice and religious change.
Carlos Colón was born in Chalchuapa, El Salvador. When he was 14, he was forced to leave El Salvador and took refuge in Guatemala City. A resident of the United States since 1986, he holds a B.M. from Belmont University and a M.M. from Baylor University. He became a U.S. citizen in 2001.
His music has been performed in festivals in the United States and abroad. Recently, his music has been performed in Carnegie Hall, Venezuela National Radio, the Calvin Worship Symposium, and the Festival de Música Contemporánea of El Salvador. His music has also received acclaim in England, Cuba and other countries.


Craft, Christy Moran

ISR Non-Resident Scholar
Department of Special Education, Counseling, and Student Affairs
Kansas State University

email Christy Craft | Publications |Homepage

Dr. Christy Moran Craft is an Associate Professor in the Department of Special Education, Counseling, and Student Affairs at Kansas State University (K-State) where she teaches both masters and doctoral level courses in higher education, student affairs, and academic advising. She joined the K-State faculty in August of 2005 after having served in other administrative and faculty roles at the University of Arizona, the University of Missouri-Kansas City, and the University of Texas-El Paso. In 2001, she received her Ph.D. in Higher Education Administration from the University of Arizona. She also holds a B.S. degree in Psychology from Bradley University.

Because of her experiences at Bradley University as an undergraduate student leader in InterVarsity Christian Fellowship and as a Resident Assistant in the residence halls, Dr. Craft developed a passion for studying about and working within higher education. Those experiences formed the foundation of her research agenda that focuses on issues of spirituality and religion in higher education, with a particular emphasis on the role and impact of Christianity in public higher education.

Dr. Craft is actively involved in and has served in various roles within College Student Educators International (ACPA) and Student Affairs Professionals in Higher Education (NASPA). She also serves on the editorial boards for the Journal of College Student Development, the Journal of College & Character, and Christian Higher Education. At K-State, she has served on numerous campus- and college-level committees, including the K-State President’s Committee on Religion and the College of Education’s Faculty Mentoring Committee. For her work, Dr. Craft has received several awards including the K-State College of Education’s Excellence in Advising Award (2008) and the K-State College of Education’s Excellence in Graduate Teaching Award (2010).


Katie Corcoran

ISR Non-Resident Fellow
West Virginia University
Curriculum Vitae   Publications

Email Katie Corcoran

Katie E. Corcoran is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at West Virginia University. She received her Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Washington as well as an MA in Sociology and an MA in International Studies (Comparative Religion). After receiving her Ph.D., she served as a post-doctoral fellow at ISR for two years. Corcoran is a theoretical generalist who studies social groups and networks as links between macro- structures and micro- attitudes and behaviors. Her research applies these lenses to several empirical subfields—organizations, culture, crime/deviance, religion, emotion, inequality, and social movements. She is interested in exploring the processes by which individuals join and leave groups, invest time and resources in them, and come to hold their norms and values. In order to test theoretical predictions, she draws on individual-level, cross- organizational, regional, and national data and uses advanced quantitative as well as qualitative methodologies. In the subfield of religion, her work theorizes individual and organizational factors that contribute to the recruitment, commitment, and retention of members. In several studies, she investigates the positive effect of social networks and emotional experiences on religious participation and charitable donations. Moving beyond micro-level membership dynamics, she theorizes and tests organizational factors that increase a religious organization’s likelihood of recruiting and retaining highly committed members.
Corcoran has published articles in journals such as Social Science Research, Sociological Inquiry, Sociological Forum, the British Journal of Social Psychology, the Journal for the Scientific of Religion, and Rationality and Society and recently published the book Religious Hostility: A Global Assessment of Hatred and Terror with Rodney Stark. She is currently completing a book manuscript on cross-national crime and victimization with Rodney Stark entitled Criminal Victimization: A Global Assessment and is also writing a book on megachurches with James K. Wellman and Kate Stockly-Meyerdirk entitled High on God: How the Megachurch Conquered America.

 


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