The Heresies That Men Do Leave https://t.co/piNlQtIeun Philip Jenkins via @anxious_bench @PatheosEvang
Don’t Click on this Link https://t.co/GfstIPE0rR @profyancey
'People want religious freedom and they want it now.' Here's how U.S. officials have taken the lead in ensuring the… https://t.co/LwK4RhMalG
Anointed With Oil: Evangelicals and the Petroleum Industry https://t.co/QWxwOtaJ18 Thomas Kidd interview with Darren Dochuk - @TGC
The State Department’s Commission on Unalienable Rights: Concerns and Five Recommendations https://t.co/V5qhpAcn7N… https://t.co/BwNH2eum7O
When Reviews Go Strange https://t.co/9YrJoOI6wb Philip Jenkins via @anxious_bench @PatheosEvang
Christian martyrs in orange jumpsuits https://t.co/1k9Q1fKoXE Philip Jenkins via @ChristianCent
Mark your calendars - Sept. 19-20 at #Baylor // "Evangelicals and the Bible: A Symposium to Honor David Bebbington" https://t.co/FP7DuLLavG
Reconsidering Immigration https://t.co/aAcZEyCwk9 @profyancey
New from Perry Glanzer and Nathan Alleman, with foreword from George Marsden - The Outrageous Idea of Christian Tea… https://t.co/X3ajFRRcM6

Clark, William R.

Non-Resident Scholar, World Politics – International RelationsClark-200
Charles Puryear Professor of Liberal Arts
Department of Political Science, Texas A&M University
Email William Clark
William Clark Vitae
Homepage

Dr. Clark is Head of the Department of Political Science and is a research fellow at the Institute for the Studies of Religion at Baylor University. His research focus is on comparative and international political economy with an emphasis on the politics of macroeconomic policy in open economy settings.

Past research projects have addressed the way monetary institutions (central bank independence and exchange rate regimes) influence the ability of incumbent leaders to use macroeconomic policy for electoral purposes.  He has also contributed to the literature on comparative party systems.  In addition, Professor Clark has published papers on the statistical testing of conditional hypotheses.

Professor Clark is also interested in the political economy of development and the political economy of religion.  Work in the former area includes current projects on the political resource curse, and the economic performance of authoritarian governments and the effect of historical protestant missionary flows on economic growth.  He is also conducting research that explains why some protestant denominations in the United States are growing while others have been in decline for decades.  Professor Clark is in the early stages of a project on the effect of globalization on income inequality.

Professor Clark is the author of Capitalism, Not Globalism and, with Matt and Sona Golder, Principles of Comparative Politics.  He has published in a variety of journals including American Political Science Review, International Organization, Comparative Political Studies, Political Analysis, and Economics & Politics.

 

Scholars

Browse By Last Name:

ABCDEFGH
IJKLMNOPQ
RSTUVWXYZ