Can evangelicals and academics talk to each other? https://t.co/VmwQoTtKPG @ayjay via @WSJ
Baylor ISR: Russell Moore: Is There a Future For Evangelical Cultural Engagement? - YouTube https://t.co/4QDJUBsn7x @drmoore @ERLC
Dispatch from Berkeley: Smoke Gets in Your Eyes https://t.co/zY7gC6btWY Elesha Coffman, @USReligionBlog
View Jeff Levin’s lecture on religion and public health at @HRSatHarvard https://t.co/InBEQHTQls
Baylor Symposium on Faith and Culture Will Commemorate the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation https://t.co/CEwLTDzLL1 @BaylorIFL
Richard Asante Lecture Nov. 14 - The Role of Religion in Electoral Politics in Ghana and America https://t.co/EItwFKOF6K
Romans 8:31, Chris Tomlin, And The Faith Of A Medieval Woman https://t.co/3h8TIn9Dye @bethallisonbarr @anxious_bench
The Role of Sports Ministries in the NFL Protests https://t.co/SszXhyPeas @p_emory @ReligPolitics
.@AndreaLTurpin podcast on her book _A New Moral Vision_ https://t.co/h9JRDk5jVV @CornellPress

Clark, William R.

Non-Resident Scholar, World Politics – International RelationsClark-200
Charles Puryear Professor of Liberal Arts
Department of Political Science, Texas A&M University
Email William Clark
William Clark Vitae
Homepage

Dr. Clark is Head of the Department of Political Science and is a research fellow at the Institute for the Studies of Religion at Baylor University. His research focus is on comparative and international political economy with an emphasis on the politics of macroeconomic policy in open economy settings.

Past research projects have addressed the way monetary institutions (central bank independence and exchange rate regimes) influence the ability of incumbent leaders to use macroeconomic policy for electoral purposes.  He has also contributed to the literature on comparative party systems.  In addition, Professor Clark has published papers on the statistical testing of conditional hypotheses.

Professor Clark is also interested in the political economy of development and the political economy of religion.  Work in the former area includes current projects on the political resource curse, and the economic performance of authoritarian governments and the effect of historical protestant missionary flows on economic growth.  He is also conducting research that explains why some protestant denominations in the United States are growing while others have been in decline for decades.  Professor Clark is in the early stages of a project on the effect of globalization on income inequality.

Professor Clark is the author of Capitalism, Not Globalism and, with Matt and Sona Golder, Principles of Comparative Politics.  He has published in a variety of journals including American Political Science Review, International Organization, Comparative Political Studies, Political Analysis, and Economics & Politics.

 

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