How the Crusades Were Won | Philip Jenkins https://t.co/CSLYpeI131
Nashville pastors — 1 black, 1 white — swap pulpits for a Sunday https://t.co/lJtznYJJ8S @tennessean on the researc… https://t.co/NlrNMgLB9X
Andrew Brunson preached peacefully for decades. Then the coup happened, writes @ArriagaKristina https://t.co/g7utPfh4LG via @WSJOpinion
As McCarrick spotlight grows, is revoking honors sensitivity or whitewash? https://t.co/7Vjy07cs6u @Crux quotes @fbeckwith
America 2040: The Church of The Rest https://t.co/jhDBm5UeBG Philip Jenkins via @PatheosEvang @anxious_bench
A revolutionary American scientist is using subatomic physics to decipher 2,000-year-old texts from the early days… https://t.co/9iNLqPNrlU
Is the Wall of Separation ‘Bad History’? https://t.co/8uDPTkIPCT Thomas Kidd, @TGC
Starting tomorrow at #Baylor, International Conference on Baptist Studies VIII https://t.co/nJ5dcWN5D2 #ICOBS2018https://t.co/EFYID6k1jZ
.@TheIRD hosted a discussion on Christian #Zionist roots in America at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.… https://t.co/E4rMcGwWVG
Thomas Kidd's conversation with @SamChen220 “Face the Issues: America's Future" on #Vimeo https://t.co/BmzdueMwSj

Clark, William R.

Non-Resident Scholar, World Politics – International RelationsClark-200
Charles Puryear Professor of Liberal Arts
Department of Political Science, Texas A&M University
Email William Clark
William Clark Vitae
Homepage

Dr. Clark is Head of the Department of Political Science and is a research fellow at the Institute for the Studies of Religion at Baylor University. His research focus is on comparative and international political economy with an emphasis on the politics of macroeconomic policy in open economy settings.

Past research projects have addressed the way monetary institutions (central bank independence and exchange rate regimes) influence the ability of incumbent leaders to use macroeconomic policy for electoral purposes.  He has also contributed to the literature on comparative party systems.  In addition, Professor Clark has published papers on the statistical testing of conditional hypotheses.

Professor Clark is also interested in the political economy of development and the political economy of religion.  Work in the former area includes current projects on the political resource curse, and the economic performance of authoritarian governments and the effect of historical protestant missionary flows on economic growth.  He is also conducting research that explains why some protestant denominations in the United States are growing while others have been in decline for decades.  Professor Clark is in the early stages of a project on the effect of globalization on income inequality.

Professor Clark is the author of Capitalism, Not Globalism and, with Matt and Sona Golder, Principles of Comparative Politics.  He has published in a variety of journals including American Political Science Review, International Organization, Comparative Political Studies, Political Analysis, and Economics & Politics.

 

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