Christianity and National Security - @ProvMagazine conference Nov. 2 and 3 https://t.co/Q3WGGOVxxe talks by Paul M… https://t.co/jXKFF5Ymel
Will the Trump presidency lead to renewed dialogue between Catholics and Evangelicals? https://t.co/FE6aUSaxxn @mattleeanderson
Register now for Billy Graham Symposium Nov. 6-7 at #Baylor | sponsored by ISR, @TruettSeminary and @BaylorHistoryhttps://t.co/u4SJ96r07i
Commemorating the 20th Anniversary of the International Religious Freedom Act https://t.co/MLpBgEe0Yp Nov. 9 in Was… https://t.co/ZvZTo12fp1
"Blasphemy and Other Threats to Freedom of Religion and Speech" @drpaulmarshall ISR video https://t.co/UxC6vBpstO #AsiaBibi
Pakistan may execute a 53-year-old woman for being Christian, writes @dhume https://t.co/6rRLG0vJdu via @WSJOpinion
Counting Believers https://t.co/b1nZIJefzA Philip Jenkins via @anxious_bench @PatheosEvang
Take & read: New books in global Christianity - Philip Jenkins @ChristianCent https://t.co/dU0oihaFiC @BUHistory @BaylorHistory
ISR’s Rebecca Shah releases new book; “Christianity in India: Conversion, Community Development, and Religious Free… https://t.co/ubFp5PYrs9
Outraged online? We all are. Here's what one Christian says about how to deal @CNN https://t.co/3K0UpxiZEY… https://t.co/Io82rUoZzT

Calendar

Nov
2
Fri
2018
2018 Baylor Center for Christian Philosophy (BCCP) Homecoming Lecture – John Lippitt @ Draper 152 - Baylor University
Nov 2 @ 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm

Forgiveness, resentment and agapic love

 

Forgiveness, it is often claimed, involves giving up, letting go or transcending feelings of resentment. Contemporary discussions of forgiveness sometimes simply assume that resentment is an entirely negative phenomenon, one that we are better off without. But is this really so? Drawing on historical and contemporary work, I question this assumption, aiming to show how resentment need not be construed simply as a reaction to personal injury or insult, and that it can speak for justice. However, if resentment has a positive dimension, and is sometimes warranted, then why would we forgive? I explore an alternative answer to this question, based on the Kierkegaard-inspired idea of forgiveness as a ‘work of love’. One objection to such a view has been the charge that such love violates justice. Through a consideration of Nicholas Wolterstorff’s distinction between benevolence-agapism and care-agapism, I aim to show that such a worry can be avoided. But the implications of this distinction, I argue, lead us to a different view of forgiveness from Wolterstorff’s: one that makes more room for a certain kind of unconditional forgiveness, central to which is the idea of hope, itself conceived of as a work of love.

John Lippitt is Professor of Ethics and Philosophy of Religion at the University of Hertfordshire, UK and Honorary Professor of Philosophy at Deakin University, Australia. John’s philosophical interests include the ethics of forgiveness, virtues and vices, the relationships between philosophy and religion, and the ethics of policing (he serves as an ethics consultant to Hertfordshire Constabulary). He is currently working on a book entitled Love’s Forgiveness, supported by a Major Research Fellowship from the Leverhulme Trust. Probably best known for his work on Kierkegaard, John’s previous publications include Humour and Irony in Kierkegaard’s Thought (2000), Kierkegaard and the Problem of Self-Love (2013) and the Routledge Guidebook to Kierkegaard’s Fear and Trembling (second edition, 2016).

co-sponsored by the Baylor Center for Christian Philosophy (BCCP) the Baylor Philosophy Department and Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion (ISR)

Nov
6
Tue
2018
Billy Graham Symposium @ Paul Powell Chapel, Truett Seminary
Nov 6 – Nov 7 all-day

When Billy Graham died in February 2018, the world lost one of the most dynamic and creative leaders in modern Christianity. In particular, the modern evangelical movement is unthinkable without his influence and guidance.

In recognition of his vital significance, Baylor University is convening a gathering of leading scholars of Billy Graham and his work, the meeting to be held on the centennial of his birth in November 1918. Together, these experts will assess and celebrate Rev. Graham’s contributions to the Christian faith across that eventful century – both in the United States and globally.

November 6, 2018

11 am Ed Stetzer, Wheaton College, The Legacy of Billy Graham

7 pm  Grant Wacker, Duke University, Humility and Ambition in the Formation of an Evangelical Titan

November 7, 2018

10:30 am Roundtable 1: Billy Graham in Global Perspective

Alister Chapman, Westmont College, The One That Got Away? Billy Graham and the Lausanne Movement

Helen Kim, Candler School of Theology, Why Was Graham’s Largest Crusade in South Korea, of All Places?

Uta Andrea Balbier, Kingís College London- Bigger in London than in Dallas: How Billy Graham’s ministry took shape in Europe

 

1:30 pm Anne Blue Wills, Davidson College, Ruth Bell Graham: In the Footprints of a Pilgrim

3:15 pm Roundtable 2: Billy Graham and American Evangelicalism

Edward Gilbreath, journalist, Pulling Down the Ropes: Howard Jones, MLK, and Billy Graham’s Pioneering Forays Against Racial Segregation

Roger Olson, Truett, Baylor University, Billy Graham as the Unofficial ‘Pope’ of American Evangelicalism

William Martin, Rice University, All the Presidents’ Man

Nov
12
Mon
2018
George Yancey Lecture @ Draper 152
Nov 12 @ 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm

Investigating Political Tolerance at Conservative Protestant Colleges and Universities

Dr. George Yancey will look at data from multiple sources to find out whether conservative Protestant campuses are more or less likely to have political diversity and to enjoy political tolerance. He will show that they are indeed more tolerant politically although they are less tolerant on theological beliefs. These results come from a book Dr Yancey has written that is currently under contract.

 

Dr. George Yancey is a Professor of sociology at the University of North Texas. He has published several research articles on the topics of institutional racial diversity, racial identity, academic bias, religious seculars, and anti-Christian hostility. His books include Compromising Scholarship (Baylor University Press) a book that explores religious and political biases in academia, There is no God (Rowman and Littlefield) a book that investigates atheism in the United States, So Many Christians, So Few Lions (Rowman and Littlefield) a book that assesses Christianophobia in the United States, Hostile Environment (Intervarsity Press) a Christian book that explores how Christians should deal with Christianophobia, and Neither Jew nor Gentile (Oxford University Press), an investigation of the racial atmosphere on Protestant campuses.

 

Jan
17
Thu
2019
Jemar Tisby Lecture @ Cox Lecture Hall, Armstrong Browning Library, Baylor University
Jan 17 @ 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm

Jemar (B.A. Notre Dame; MDiv RTS Jackson) is the president of The Witness: A Black Christian Collective where he writes about race, religion, and culture. He is also the co-host of “Pass The Mic”, a podcast that amplifies dynamic voices for a diverse church. His writing has been featured in the Washington Post, CNN, Vox, The Atlantic, and the New York Times. He has spoken nation-wide at conferences on racial reconciliation, U.S. history, and the church. Jemar is a PhD student in History at the University of Mississippi studying race, religion and social movements in the 20th century. In January 2019, he will release his first book, The Color of Compromise: The Truth about the American Church’s Complicity in Racism. Follow him on Twitter @JemarTisby.

Calendar