Can evangelicals and academics talk to each other? https://t.co/VmwQoTtKPG @ayjay via @WSJ
Baylor ISR: Russell Moore: Is There a Future For Evangelical Cultural Engagement? - YouTube https://t.co/4QDJUBsn7x @drmoore @ERLC
Dispatch from Berkeley: Smoke Gets in Your Eyes https://t.co/zY7gC6btWY Elesha Coffman, @USReligionBlog
View Jeff Levin’s lecture on religion and public health at @HRSatHarvard https://t.co/InBEQHTQls
Baylor Symposium on Faith and Culture Will Commemorate the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation https://t.co/CEwLTDzLL1 @BaylorIFL
Richard Asante Lecture Nov. 14 - The Role of Religion in Electoral Politics in Ghana and America https://t.co/EItwFKOF6K
Romans 8:31, Chris Tomlin, And The Faith Of A Medieval Woman https://t.co/3h8TIn9Dye @bethallisonbarr @anxious_bench
The Role of Sports Ministries in the NFL Protests https://t.co/SszXhyPeas @p_emory @ReligPolitics
.@AndreaLTurpin podcast on her book _A New Moral Vision_ https://t.co/h9JRDk5jVV @CornellPress

Calendar

Oct
25
Wed
2017
2017 Baylor Symposium on Faith and Culture @ Baylor University
Oct 25 – Oct 27 all-day

282258

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION

The year 2017 marks the five-hundredth anniversary of the beginning of the European Reformation, a time of incalculable significance for the history of Christianity. This was the decisive moment at whichthe Bible was translated into the leading European languages. The rise of printing vastly enhanced the significance of that change, for the first time placing the book in the hands of ordinary people. That movement began a cultural and religious revolution that remains very much alive today, after a half-millennium. In that sense, we still today live in the shadow of the Reformation, and arguably in its still flowing currents. As theologian Karl Barth famously declared, “Ecclesia semper reformanda” – the church is always to be reformed.

Confirmed speakers include:

  • Mark Noll, University of Notre Dame
  • Timothy George, Beeson Divinity School
  • David Lyle Jeffrey, Baylor University
  • Randall Zachman, University of Notre Dame
  • Bruce Gordon, Yale Divinity School
  • Johanna Rahner, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen
  • Robert Kolb, Concordia Seminary, St. Louis
  • Carl Trueman, Westminster Theological Seminary
  • Beth Allison Barr, Baylor University
  • Iain Provan, Regent College
  • Tamara Lewis, Southern Methodist University
  • Godwin Makabi, Anglican Church of Nigeria

 This event is co-sponsored by:
Nov
1
Wed
2017
Here I Stand: Conscience, Reformation, and Religious Freedom Across the Centuries @ Berkley Center, Copley Lounge
Nov 1 all-day

On October 31, 1517, Martin Luther published his Ninety-Five Theses urging sweeping religious reforms and catalyzing the Protestant Reformation. The Reformation unleashed an intensified focus on freedom of conscience, with dramatic social and political consequences. It fostered new notions of religious liberty as well as new frameworks for civic life. At the same time, the Reformation built upon centuries of Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox theologies of conscience, dignity, and freedom in ways that are not always understood.

This symposium will explore these dynamics, but also examine how Christianity per se has unleashed distinctive and powerful principles of conscience and freedom across its 2,000-year history, even in the face of what Pope Francis has called the “ecumenism of blood”—the severe religious persecution affecting numerous Christian and non-Christian communities around the world.

This symposium is co-sponsored by the Witherspoon Institute and the Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion and commemorates the launch of the two-volume series Christianity and Freedom.

SCHEDULE

10:00 a.m. – 10:20 a.m. | Welcome and Introduction
Shaun Casey, Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs
Thomas Farr, Religious Freedom Research Project
Timothy Samuel Shah, Religious Freedom Research Project

10:20 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. | Keynote Address
Robert Louis Wilken, University of Virginia

11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. | Keynote Conversation: Catholic and Protestant Contributions to Freedom
Thomas Farr, Religious Freedom Research Project (moderator)
Matthew Franck, Witherspoon Institute
Melissa Rogers, Brookings Institution
Robert Louis Wilken, University of Virginia

12:30 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. | Lunch

1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. | Christianity’s Historical Contributions to Freedom
Timothy Shah, Religious Freedom Research Project (moderator)
Elizabeth Prodromou, Tufts University
Kyle Harper, University of Oklahoma
Slavica Jakelic, Valparaiso University
David Lantigua, The Catholic University of America

2:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. | Break

2:45 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. | Christianity’s Contemporary Contributions to Freedom
Allen Hertzke, University of Oklahoma (moderator)
Jacques Berlinerblau, Georgetown University
Daniel Philpott, University of Notre Dame
Sara Singha, Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs
Fenggang Yang, Purdue University

4:15 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. | Concluding Remarks
Timothy Samuel Shah, Religious Freedom Research Project

Nov
14
Tue
2017
Richard Asante Lecture @ Cox Lecture Hall, Armstrong Browning Library, Baylor University
Nov 14 @ 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm

The Role of Religion in Electoral Politics in Ghana and America: The Surprising Similarities.

In this talk, Asante examines the role of religion (Christian) in electoral politics in Ghana and America during the 2016 Elections. He will present preliminary findings on ongoing research project on religion and electoral politics in Ghana and America. He demonstrates that despite the separation of religion from the state, religion played an important role in the 2016 Elections in Ghana and America. He concludes by looking at the implications for the future of democracy in Ghana and America.

Dr. Richard Asante a Senior Research Fellow and Lecturer in the Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana, Legon. Asante holds a PhD in Political Science under the Harvard University, Boston (USA) and University of Ghana Split-PhD Program. He previously served as the Head of Department and Research Coordinator of the History and Politics Unit of the Institute of African Studies from August 2014 to July 2016.  Asante teaches courses in comparative politics of Africa, peace and security in Africa and political economy of African development at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. He has special research interest in democratization, social capital and religion and politics. Asante has received a number of awards and fellowships. He was a Resident Scholar in International Relations at Pomona College, Claremont, USA during the 2016-2017 academic year where he taught courses in comparative politics of Africa and peace and security in Africa. He previously served as a Visiting Scholar at the New School University, New York (2004); Oxford University, UK (2005), University of Cape Town (UCT), South Africa; and Northwestern University, Evanston, USA (2012-2013). Asante is the Regional Manager for West Africa in the Varieties of Democracy Project (V-DEM) based in the University of Gothenburg, Sweden researching into alternative ways of measuring democracy globally. He is also a Mo Ibrahim Scholar of African Governance and Development; and Afrobarometer Scholar, and Associate member of the Afrobarometer Research Team, Ghana under the auspices of the Ghana Center for Democracy and Development (CDD-Ghana).

 

Nov
29
Wed
2017
Brent Landau Lecture @ Cox Lecture Hall, Armstrong Browning Library, Baylor University
Nov 29 @ 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm

Christmas from the Wise Men’s Point of View: The Apocryphal Revelation of the Magi

The Revelation of the Magi is an apocryphal early Christian writing purporting to be the personal testimony of the Magi (better known as the “Wise Men” or the “Three Kings”) on the events surrounding the coming of Christ. It is by far the longest early Christian text devoted to these figures, and contains several fascinating interpretations of the biblical Magi story (Matthew 2:1-12) not seen elsewhere. In this text there are twelve Magi, or possibly more, in contrast to the traditional enumeration of three. They reside in a semi-mythical land in the Far East called “Shir”; and perhaps most startlingly, the Magi’s star is actually Jesus Christ himself, who transforms from star to human and back again throughout the narrative.

Brent Landau is a lecturer in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. He received his Th.D and M.Div from Harvard University, and a B.A. in Religious Studies from the University of Iowa. Brent’s chief research is on ancient Christian apocryphal writings, particularly traditions about Jesus’ birth and childhood and fragments of Christian Apocrypha preserved on papyri.

Nov
30
Thu
2017
Jerry Walls Lecture @ Paul L. Foster Campus for Business and Innovation, Foster 250
Nov 30 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

CS Lewis and the Case for Mere Purgatory

It is well known that CS Lewis took very seriously the doctrines of heaven and hell, and wrote extensively about them. It is less well known that he also believed in purgatory. Although his explicit writings on purgatory are relatively scant, there is ample material relevant to the doctrine in his theological works, especially Mere Christianity. Walls will argue that Lewis provides good reasons to affirm a version of the doctrine of purgatory, for Protestants as well as Roman Catholics.

Jerry L. Walls is Professor of Philosophy and Scholar in Residence at Houston Baptist University. Among his books is a trilogy on the afterlife: Hell: The Logic of Damnation; Heaven: The Logic of Eternal Joy; and Purgatory: The Logic of Total Transformation; and more recently, Heaven, Hell and Purgatory: Rethinking the Things that Matter Most. He is the co-editor (with Trent Dougherty), of the forthcoming volume, Two Dozen (or so) Arguments for God: The Plantinga Project.

Calendar