What Happens When an Evangelical Pundit, Armed Only with 58K Twitter Followers and a Reference to the Bebbington Qu… https://t.co/CUzgPfGhK7
On Writing the History of the 21st Century https://t.co/tqe0081ZQd Philip Jenkins via @JohnFea1
Grant Wacker Lecture from ISR's Billy Graham Symposium, Nov. 6, 2018 https://t.co/prLFOKfq4M @DukeDivinity
On Writing (Very) Modern History https://t.co/BzFs2Pyblw Philip Jenkins via @anxious_bench @PatheosEvang
.@Baylor Professor John Haldane Named as One of “Fifty Minds that Matter” by Roman Catholic Periodical… https://t.co/GB7lcZk0RN
Wang Yi, one of China's best-known Protestant pastors, was charged with "inciting subversion of state power," a sig… https://t.co/sg6GW2PF0H
Mediterranean maelstrom: The ideas that formed in the Second Temple period - John Barton reviews Philip Jenkins's C… https://t.co/HJeSC3PZ2G
Chinese police raid prominent house church - @WORLD_mag https://t.co/NQ5wYIwKGM
Where next for contemporary worship music? https://t.co/VIwgFhnDKH @churchtimes on the work of @Baylor's Dr. Monique Ingalls @OUPReligion
A new charter restates America’s commitment to freedom of religion and conscience, writes @BillGalstonhttps://t.co/ZmqqSPApyI

Calendar

Jan
17
Thu
2019
Jemar Tisby Lecture @ Cox Lecture Hall, Armstrong Browning Library, Baylor University
Jan 17 @ 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm

How to Fight Racism

Like an un-killable cockroach, racism keeps scurrying back into our lives to creep us out and contaminate everything it touches. No matter how many laws we pass, resolutions we write, or programs we implement, racism still seems just as present today as it has been in centuries past. Why is this? Why can’t we make more progress faster in combating racism? The problem is we keep fighting systems of oppression but we do little to disrupt the narrative of racial superiority and inferiority. This session will help us understand how America created the story of anti-black racism and spend some time explaining ways to flip the script in order to pursue meaningful racial justice right now.

Jemar (B.A. Notre Dame; MDiv RTS Jackson) is the president of The Witness: A Black Christian Collective where he writes about race, religion, and culture. He is also the co-host of “Pass The Mic”, a podcast that amplifies dynamic voices for a diverse church. His writing has been featured in the Washington Post, CNN, Vox, The Atlantic, and the New York Times. He has spoken nation-wide at conferences on racial reconciliation, U.S. history, and the church. Jemar is a PhD candidate in History at the University of Mississippi studying race, religion and social movements in the 20th century. In January 2019, he will release his first book, The Color of Compromise: The Truth about the American Church’s Complicity in Racism. Follow him on Twitter @JemarTisby.

Feb
18
Mon
2019
Bruce Hindmarsh Lecture @ Cox Lecture Hall, Armstrong Browning Library, Baylor University
Feb 18 @ 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm

Evangelicals and the Rise of Natural Ethics.

Can you be good without God? It was in the 18th century that ethics began to separate from religion. Moral philosophy was in many ways looking for an Isaac Newton of the moral sciences, and there were many who thought that human nature and its problems and opportunities could be fully described on an empirical basis, rather than from the point of view of divine revelation. On these matters, the early evangelicals were more at odds with their culture. It seemed to them that God’s revealed law was psychologically penetrating and ethically comprehensive. Its diagnosis of the human condition was devastating, and one’s only hope was to trust in a divine Saviour. They spoke therefore of the “spirituality and extent of the law” as a doctrine to awaken men and women to their true spiritual condition. This lecture will look at their view of human nature against the Enlightenment background.

Bruce Hindmarsh took his D.Phil. degree in theology at Oxford University in 1993. From 1995 to 1997 he was also a research fellow at Christ Church, Oxford. He has since published and spoken widely to international audiences on the history of early British evangelicalism.

The Spirit of Early Evangelicalism
True Religion in a Modern World
By:Bruce Hindmarsh

His articles have appeared in respected academic journals such as Church History, the Journal of Ecclesiastical History, and the Huntington Library Quarterly. He is the author of three major books: John Newton and the English Evangelical Tradition (Oxford University Press, 1996), The Evangelical Conversion Narrative (Oxford University Press, 2005), and The Spirit of Early Evangelicalism (Oxford University Press, 2018). Bruce has been the recipient of numerous teaching awards, research grants and fellowships. He has also been a Mayers Research Fellow at the Huntington Library and a holder of the Henry Luce III Theological Fellowship.   A fellow of the Royal Historical Society, he is a past-president of the American Society of Church History. He teaches the history of Christian spirituality, and speaks often to lay audiences as well as preaching in his own church and elsewhere. A former staff worker for Youth for Christ and founding director of Camp Cedarwood, he is an active lay member of an Anglican Church. He is married to Carolyn, and they have three children: Bethany, Matthew and Sam.

Calendar