Can evangelicals and academics talk to each other? https://t.co/VmwQoTtKPG @ayjay via @WSJ
Baylor ISR: Russell Moore: Is There a Future For Evangelical Cultural Engagement? - YouTube https://t.co/4QDJUBsn7x @drmoore @ERLC
Dispatch from Berkeley: Smoke Gets in Your Eyes https://t.co/zY7gC6btWY Elesha Coffman, @USReligionBlog
View Jeff Levin’s lecture on religion and public health at @HRSatHarvard https://t.co/InBEQHTQls
Baylor Symposium on Faith and Culture Will Commemorate the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation https://t.co/CEwLTDzLL1 @BaylorIFL
Richard Asante Lecture Nov. 14 - The Role of Religion in Electoral Politics in Ghana and America https://t.co/EItwFKOF6K
Romans 8:31, Chris Tomlin, And The Faith Of A Medieval Woman https://t.co/3h8TIn9Dye @bethallisonbarr @anxious_bench
The Role of Sports Ministries in the NFL Protests https://t.co/SszXhyPeas @p_emory @ReligPolitics
.@AndreaLTurpin podcast on her book _A New Moral Vision_ https://t.co/h9JRDk5jVV @CornellPress

Carnes, Natalie

ISR Faculty Fellow
219794
Baylor University
Department of Religion
Natalie Carnes Vitae

Natalie Carnes is Assistant Professor of Theology in the Baylor Religion Department. Her theological journey began at Harvard (A.B.) and continued into graduate studies at the University of Chicago (M.A.) and Duke (Ph.D.).

As a systematic theologian, Natalie reflects on traditional doctrines through slightly less traditional themes. Her first book, Beauty: A Theological Engagement with Gregory of Nyssa (Cascade Books, 2014), traces the arc of systematic theology through a field of questions about beauty. The puzzles of this book inspired the next—her current book project Image and Presence: A Christological Reflection on Iconoclasm and Iconophilia. In it, Natalie argues for understanding iconoclasm as internal to imaging by reflecting on Christ as the Image of the Invisible God. She has published in journals including Modern Theology, Journal of Religion, and Pro Ecclesia on these themes as well as those related to religious authority, theological knowledge, and her third, nascent book project: an attempt to open the conversations of theological anthropology to include reflection on children. She hopes to make some headway on all of this as a 2015-16 Louisville Institute sabbatical grantee.

Scholars

Browse By Last Name:

ABCDEFGH
IJKLMNOPQ
RSTUVWXYZ