Paul Froese on Meaning and Purpose - ISR ReligionWatch https://t.co/HywQz3LQcg
Baylor Launches Center for Christian Philosophy | @Baylor University https://t.co/aRXOb93cuT via @baylorumedia
Becoming a More Sensible Evidentialist about Jesus - Stephen Wykstra lecture Aug. 22 https://t.co/Ofq9GfxUwK
The many resurrections of Chinese Christianity https://t.co/XXvKByoVkX Philip Jenkins @ChristianCent @iandenisjohnson
Russell Moore at #Baylor on Sept. 5, 3:30 - Is There a Future For Evangelical Cultural Engagement? https://t.co/MP4z4auWRv @drmoore
Check out the website for the newly-launched Baylor Center on Christian Philosophy https://t.co/DMvtVHqDhk
Rescuing Syriac Manuscripts in Iraq - The ASOR Blog https://t.co/wHcMzptt7d
Verdict on first religious freedom report under Trump: Great rhetoric, what do we do? https://t.co/cCiHXRhmGB @Crux @RFInstitute
Saving Christians from Genocide | William Doino Jr. | @firstthingsmag https://t.co/KNdvWKNNej
Russell Moore at #Baylor on Sept. 5, 3:30 - Is There a Future For Evangelical Cultural Engagement? https://t.co/MplHdi9FWW

Carnes, Natalie

ISR Faculty Fellow
219794
Baylor University
Department of Religion
Natalie Carnes Vitae

Natalie Carnes is Assistant Professor of Theology in the Baylor Religion Department. Her theological journey began at Harvard (A.B.) and continued into graduate studies at the University of Chicago (M.A.) and Duke (Ph.D.).

As a systematic theologian, Natalie reflects on traditional doctrines through slightly less traditional themes. Her first book, Beauty: A Theological Engagement with Gregory of Nyssa (Cascade Books, 2014), traces the arc of systematic theology through a field of questions about beauty. The puzzles of this book inspired the next—her current book project Image and Presence: A Christological Reflection on Iconoclasm and Iconophilia. In it, Natalie argues for understanding iconoclasm as internal to imaging by reflecting on Christ as the Image of the Invisible God. She has published in journals including Modern Theology, Journal of Religion, and Pro Ecclesia on these themes as well as those related to religious authority, theological knowledge, and her third, nascent book project: an attempt to open the conversations of theological anthropology to include reflection on children. She hopes to make some headway on all of this as a 2015-16 Louisville Institute sabbatical grantee.

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