This Orient Isle https://t.co/9UbwDw2hyw Philip Jenkins at the Anxious Bench blog
Heritage or hate? In Europe, commemorating a complicated past | Philip Jenkins, The Christian Century https://t.co/9eZyIIWMXK
Smithsonian to host 1st major US Quran exhibition - The Washington Post https://t.co/yGnmd2mhIP
A journey of friendship for 2 Baylor profs, from the Middle East to Texas https://t.co/mJyZvohpdO
Should Christians Support Gun Control? | Thomas Kidd - TGC https://t.co/ZbVEs7zV66
Trump taps outgoing Southern Baptist head for religious board https://t.co/tuELDHsPCn The Tennessean quotes Thomas Kidd
Trump Syllabus - The Chronicle of Higher Education https://t.co/UMnIbVXILJ with input from Philip Jenkins
A new reformation is under way: Philip Jenkins addresses mid council leaders at Presbyterian General Assembly https://t.co/eCcSOtxkCr
The Church and the American Flag | Thomas Kidd - TGC https://t.co/naYUhTbBDD
Mary Eberstadt's new book is It's Dangerous to Believe: Religious Freedom and Its Enemies https://t.co/ZOy9CK1qsn

Religion and Population Health (PRPH)

health_programs

Director
Dr. Jeff Levin
Director of PRPH

The mission of the Baylor ISR Program on Religion and Population Health (PRPH) is to conduct and promote social, behavioral, and epidemiologic research on the impact of religious involvement on indicators of population health. These indicators include population-wide rates of morbidity, mortality, and disability and personal and population-wide measures of physical and mental health status, general well-being, and aging. Investigations are grounded in theory and methods drawn from the fields of sociology, psychology, epidemiology, and social demography. Special emphasis is given to longitudinal, gerontological, and life-course research; to age, gender, social class, and racial and ethnic variation; and to underinvestigated religious populations.

Scholarly work by the Director of PRPH, Dr. Jeff Levin, and his associates focuses on (a) epidemiologic research on religion and population health in national and international samples, (b) social and gerontological research on religion among underinvestigated populations (especially Jewish and African-American respondents), (c) empirical research on the health impact of faith-based other-regarding attitudes and behaviors (primarily altruistic and compassionate love), and (d) historical and theoretical studies of religious themes related to complementary and alternative medicine, mind-body healing, and spirituality and consciousness. Dr. Levin also has additional interest in larger themes at the interface of theology and medicine, in the construction of a scholarly field around the intersection of Judaism and health, and in contributing to the national conversation on the role of faith and faith-based initiatives in health policy.

Dr. Levin and PRPH have a variety of ongoing projects. These include (a) conducting social and epidemiologic research on Judaism and population health, (b) formulating a role for faith-based resources in the national and global health policy arenas, and (c) writing scholarly papers and reviews on various subjects, especially the work of healers. Links to these projects are found below.

Judaism and Population Health Research

Faith-Based Initiatives in Health Policy

Research on Healers and Healing