Can evangelicals and academics talk to each other? https://t.co/VmwQoTtKPG @ayjay via @WSJ
Baylor ISR: Russell Moore: Is There a Future For Evangelical Cultural Engagement? - YouTube https://t.co/4QDJUBsn7x @drmoore @ERLC
Dispatch from Berkeley: Smoke Gets in Your Eyes https://t.co/zY7gC6btWY Elesha Coffman, @USReligionBlog
View Jeff Levin’s lecture on religion and public health at @HRSatHarvard https://t.co/InBEQHTQls
Baylor Symposium on Faith and Culture Will Commemorate the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation https://t.co/CEwLTDzLL1 @BaylorIFL
Richard Asante Lecture Nov. 14 - The Role of Religion in Electoral Politics in Ghana and America https://t.co/EItwFKOF6K
Romans 8:31, Chris Tomlin, And The Faith Of A Medieval Woman https://t.co/3h8TIn9Dye @bethallisonbarr @anxious_bench
The Role of Sports Ministries in the NFL Protests https://t.co/SszXhyPeas @p_emory @ReligPolitics
.@AndreaLTurpin podcast on her book _A New Moral Vision_ https://t.co/h9JRDk5jVV @CornellPress

National Domestic Violence Fatality Review Initiative

The National Domestic Violence Fatality Review Initiative (NDVFRI) was an initiative funded through a $1,344,025 grant awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, Office of Justice  Programs, U.S. Department of Justice.

Based at Baylor University from 2005 until April 2009, the NDVFRI was the first of its kind, creating a clearinghouse and resource center dedicated to domestic violence fatality review. Currently 30 states have some form of domestic violence fatality review. Nearly all of the remaining states have expressed interest in conducting reviews and receiving technical assistance to do so. Domestic violence fatality review requires a paradigm shift from a culture of blame to a culture of safety in which deaths are reviewed through a lens of preventive accountability. With vigor, trust, honesty, and candor, communities can establish reliable systems that value accountability and help prevent future death and injury from domestic violence.
Specifically, the Initiative focused on the following objectives:

  1. Preventing domestic violence homicides and domestic violence in general,
  2. Preserving the safety of battered women,
  3. Holding accountable the perpetrators of domestic violence,
  4. Identifying gaps in service delivery as well as ways to remedy these shortcomings among agencies and organizations, and
  5. Providing technical assistance to the states developing and continuing their fatality review work.