new book from Perry Glanzer: Restoring the Soul of the University https://t.co/vAQ44g5M2t @ivpacademic
American Violence: The Long Civil War https://t.co/FvxCYguKFL Philip Jenkins, @anxious_bench
Mark Pike Lecture on "Narnian Virtues and Character Education" Apr. 4 at #Baylor https://t.co/BOrBugli2x
Ann Killebrew Lecture - "The Emergence of Israel in Bible and Archaeology" https://t.co/LqlzLuLTPi
#Baylor provost L. Gregory Jones: "Learning intuition" https://t.co/5REQLaZfhg
Early Syriac Christian Reactions to the Rise of Islam, Michael Philip Penn talk at #Baylor - YouTube https://t.co/PuYbjJvlZx
A Reasonable Reading List for Medieval Christianity: Part 2 https://t.co/hHj8ULFpwd @bethallisonbarr @anxious_bench
Ben Franklin’s Calvinist Father | Thomas Kidd, @TGC https://t.co/yZ6fk3haqG
Exploring the Ancient Gospels of Ethiopia - Christian Sahner @MarginaliaROB https://t.co/VxCcpGpAf6
The Benedict Option and the Way of Exchange | Alan Jacobs | @firstthingsmag https://t.co/D94KsDHJtF

Merit Beyond the Badges: Eagle Scouts in Later Life

Just out, after a two-year scientific study, the research report – Eagle Scouts: Merit Beyond the Badge

Click here to read the study

RESEARCH UPDATE:

Americans believe in virtuous behavior, and Scouting helps – Byron Johnson Star Telegram-
[READ THE OP-ED]

In 2012 Baylor Researchers Launched a two-year Scientific Study of Prosocial Benefits of Scouting.

[ READ THE PRESS RELEASE ]

New Studies Help Boy Scouts ‘Be Prepared’

A Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful — and the subject of much research after a hundred years in existence.

Miller-McCune-CULTURE 8-17-2012
[more..]
Younger Generations Less Likely to Join Boy Scouts: Boy Scouts go on to achieve higher levels of education, make more money
by Byron R. Johnson and Jon Clifton, December 12, 2010 [more..]
Click here for a pdf of the report 

According to the Scout Law, a Boy Scout is “Trustworthy, Loyal, Helpful, Friendly, Courteous, Kind, Obedient, Cheerful, Thrifty, Brave, Clean and Reverent.”

But does he stay that way as he grows up?

That’s a question never scientifically studied – until now. Researchers with Baylor University’s Institute for Studies of Religion  received a two-year, $992,000 grant from the John Templeton Foundation for a series of studies examining the impact of Scouting in fostering positive youth development and healthy, virtuous behaviors – termed “prosocial behavior” – exhibited by Scouts.

The grant was awarded to the institute’s co-directors, Dr. Byron R. Johnson and Dr. Rodney Stark.

According to the Scouting Magazine blog: “The timing of this research coincides perfectly with the BSA’s 100th Anniversary. The results could help guide the program’s leaders through the next 100 years. And that leadership starts with Chief Scout Executive Bob Mazzuca, who said he looks forward to reading the results in a couple of years.”

The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law

Active in all 50 states, Boy Scouts reaches close to 3 million youth each year.  Anecdotally, large numbers of adolescents involved with Boy Scouts and especially those achieving the rank of Eagle Scout, see dramatic changes in their lives including the development of character virtues such as patience, kindness, humility, service, purpose, honesty, duty, tenacity, and commitment—what might be termed as healthy, virtuous, or prosocial behaviors.  But what are the factors that contribute to these young lives developing and sustaining prosocial behavior?  What differentiates those adolescents who experience growth from those who do not?  The present proposal seeks to expand our scientific understanding of positive youth development by examining the alleged success of Scouting, and especially with those achieving the rank of Eagle Scout.  Drawing upon a number of methodological approaches and data sources, we will undertake, complete, publish, and disseminate widely a series of empirical studies documenting the long-term impact of being a Boy Scout.

Boy Scouts of America: www.scouting.org