Ten Reasons We Need Rigorous Research on Effective Compassion, by Byron Johnson – University of St. Thomas Law Jour… https://t.co/nAE8hSpvGb
New History Textbook Grapples with America’s Complex Religious History https://t.co/cyJa5SoTXw @ThomasSKiddhttps://t.co/72kZKsSNEV
Losing the Faith: Of Apostates, Renegades, and Traitors https://t.co/Fe6Y6MY5Vp Philip Jenkins via @anxious_bench @PatheosEvang
God imagery and affective outcomes in a spiritually integrative inpatient program https://t.co/4zBryktmwP article f… https://t.co/EY2ziBv6i1
Understanding the debate over married priests at the Amazon synod https://t.co/Jdv2hhmFvZ via @Crux @JohnLAllenJr
How safe are congregations and clergy from automation? https://t.co/9xCBT8Xl2r from the latest issue of Baylor ISR… https://t.co/Eq6BqNEhtG
When Hollywood and Big Business Attack https://t.co/JUZGrLgwBU via @profyancey
Robert Kagan and the Many Meanings of Liberalism https://t.co/vw4EFEriij via @ProvMagazine @drpaulmarshall
Translation and Paraphrase https://t.co/DVpW6ortJ7 Philip Jenkins via @anxious_bench @PatheosEvang
How Churches Can Bridge the Marriage Divide | @FactsAndTrends @WilcoxNMP https://t.co/t98QVjWext

Program on Prosocial Behavior

prosocial.programs

Director
Dr. Byron R. Johnson
Director of Prosocial Behavior
Jang-web Dr. Sung Joon Jang
Co-Director of Prosocial Behavior

Criminology has always been only “half” of a field. Its focus is limited to antisocial behavior, with almost no attention ever given to prosocial activities. That is, criminologists ask why people do, or do not, commit crimes; they rarely ask why people do, or do not do, good deeds.

Program on Prosocial Behavior emphasizes the neglected “half” of human behavior. For example, why do so many people generously give money to help those in need? Or, why do most of the people reared in ‘bad’ neighborhoods turn out not only to be law-abiding, but to be good citizens? Indeed, how are people transformed from antisocial patterns of behavior to positive patterns? In keeping with the overall mission of ISR, the role of religion in promoting prosocial behavior will be the central concern. Not only the role of religiousness in guiding individual behavior, but the role of faith-based groups and organizations in fostering prosocial activities.

TYRO Dads

Assessing the Long-Term Effectiveness of Seminaries in Maximum Security Prisons

Character Virtues and College Students: A Pilot Study

Merit Beyond the Badges: Eagle Scouts in Later Life

Prosocial Youth Behavior

Economics of Religion

National Domestic Violence Fatality Review Initiative

Faith & Community Technical Support (FACTS)