The Legacy of John Gerstner, Presbyterian Historian and Mentor to R.C. Sproul https://t.co/TEB3YHM9iI Thomas Kidd, @TGC
Multiracial Congregations Have Nearly Doubled, But They Still Lag Behind the Makeup of Neighborhoods - Kevin Doughe… https://t.co/4dLX5IXpRs
Canada’s Supreme Court Ruling Is a Grave Blow to Religious Freedom—and Not Only in Canada https://t.co/4vJDZuSTlw… https://t.co/kWNHK7u8Xn
Urbi et Orbi: Pope Francis has pursued Christian unity. But the culture wars and the growth of newer Christian chur… https://t.co/kiM2SaZ9Yr
"Living Holy Ghost Girl": The 2018 Werlin Lecture featuring author Donna M. Johnson - June 22 at #Baylor https://t.co/vbhbSq6Uvj
The Family Feud that Changed the Shape of Christian Higher Education https://t.co/lyVS4wyvjn Barry Hankins via @CTMagazine
Southern Baptists Call Off the Culture War https://t.co/tYKgnnwpQZ @JonathanMerritt @TheAtlantic quotes Barry Hankins #sbc18
Brandon O’Brien on Isaac Backus and Religious Liberty https://t.co/6BxDbf0AfA @RoRcast
To survive our high-speed society, cultivate 'temporal bandwidth' | Alan Jacobs https://t.co/w0rFjoALIk @ayjay @guardian #Baylor
For Linda Livingstone, #Baylor's future is tied to research https://t.co/e10hr5o9hD? @wacotrib

REIMAGINING GLOBAL CHRISTIAN HISTORY: FRESH INSIGHTS SYMPOSIUM

When:
February 21, 2018 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
2018-02-21T13:00:00-01:00
2018-02-21T17:00:00-01:00
Where:
Cox Lecture Hall, Armstrong Browning Library, Baylor University
Cost:
Free

REIMAGINING GLOBAL CHRISTIAN HISTORY: FRESH INSIGHTS

As Christianity has spread around the world in recent decades, so scholars are asking exciting new questions about the global dimensions of Christian history: A global faith demands a global history. Enriching this project has been the application of new perspectives and methodologies, quests for new linkages and parallels. Our session today presents some provocative and enriching examples of this emerging global history, with a special focus on the medieval and early modern worlds.

1:00-2:45pm- SESSION 1

Anna Redhair, MA candidate, History, Baylor University
Women’s Roles in the Book of the Saint of the Ethiopian Church

Beth Allison Barr, History, Baylor University
Paul on Women Reconsidered: Medieval Europe to Africa

2:45-3:00pm BREAK

3:00-4:30pm
Verónica A. Gutiérrez, History, Azusa Pacific University
Luther in the New World: Native People and Reformation in Sixteenth- Century New Spain

4:30-5:00 pm
Q and A for all panelists: The next steps in global Christian history

Anna Redhair is a second-year Masters student in the Baylor History Program. Her research focuses on medieval pilgrimage and women, and she will defend her thesis in April 2018.

Beth Allison Barr is an Associate Professor of History at Baylor University, where she also serves as the Graduate Program Director. She is a medieval historian, specializing in women and religion. Her first book, The Pastoral Care of Women in Late Medieval England, was published by Boydell in 2008 and she has completed a working draft of her second book project, Women in English Sermons 1350-1500. Out of the several articles she has written, her favorite comparing representations of Mary Magadalen in orthodox and heretical sermons was runner-up for the Jane Dempsey Douglas Prize in 2016. Her research has been generously supported by Baylor as well as by a Sabbatical Grant for Researchers from the Louisville Institute, and she is a regular writer for the Patheos blog The Anxious Bench.

Verónica A. Gutiérrez is an Associate Professor of Latin American History and Director of Undergraduate Research at Azusa Pacific University. She is the first Latin American specialist at APU. Her training in Colonial Mexico, Mesoamerican Cultures, Medieval Castile, Franciscan Spirituality, and the Early Modern Catholic World landed her a position as an Internationalization Faculty Fellow in APU’s Center for Global Learning and Engagement, where she worked toward improving student experience, particularly during the Semester in Ecuador.
Gutiérrez’s own research examines the development of indigenous-Christianity in sixteenth-century Mexico, especially by native peoples ministered by Franciscans. This work finds voice in her book project, Converting a Sacred City: Franciscans, Nahuas, and Spaniards in San Pedro Cholula, 1528-1648. Of her publications, “Quetzalcoatl’s Enlightened City: A Close Reading of Bernard Picart’s Engraving of Cholollan/Cholula,” received the Hubert Herring Award from the Pacific Coast Council on Latin American Studies. She has received a variety of institutional research support, including from Fulbright, the Ford Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, Spain’s Ministry of Culture, the Academy of American Franciscan History, the Latin American Institute at UCLA, the Faculty Research Council at APU, and the Graves Award in the Humanities.