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On Writing the History of the 21st Century https://t.co/tqe0081ZQd Philip Jenkins via @JohnFea1
Grant Wacker Lecture from ISR's Billy Graham Symposium, Nov. 6, 2018 https://t.co/prLFOKfq4M @DukeDivinity
On Writing (Very) Modern History https://t.co/BzFs2Pyblw Philip Jenkins via @anxious_bench @PatheosEvang
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Wang Yi, one of China's best-known Protestant pastors, was charged with "inciting subversion of state power," a sig… https://t.co/sg6GW2PF0H
Mediterranean maelstrom: The ideas that formed in the Second Temple period - John Barton reviews Philip Jenkins's C… https://t.co/HJeSC3PZ2G
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Where next for contemporary worship music? https://t.co/VIwgFhnDKH @churchtimes on the work of @Baylor's Dr. Monique Ingalls @OUPReligion
A new charter restates America’s commitment to freedom of religion and conscience, writes @BillGalstonhttps://t.co/ZmqqSPApyI

REIMAGINING GLOBAL CHRISTIAN HISTORY: FRESH INSIGHTS SYMPOSIUM

When:
February 21, 2018 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
2018-02-21T13:00:00-01:00
2018-02-21T17:00:00-01:00
Where:
Cox Lecture Hall, Armstrong Browning Library, Baylor University
Cost:
Free

REIMAGINING GLOBAL CHRISTIAN HISTORY: FRESH INSIGHTS

As Christianity has spread around the world in recent decades, so scholars are asking exciting new questions about the global dimensions of Christian history: A global faith demands a global history. Enriching this project has been the application of new perspectives and methodologies, quests for new linkages and parallels. Our session today presents some provocative and enriching examples of this emerging global history, with a special focus on the medieval and early modern worlds.

1:00-2:45pm- SESSION 1

Anna Redhair, MA candidate, History, Baylor University
Women’s Roles in the Book of the Saint of the Ethiopian Church

Beth Allison Barr, History, Baylor University
Paul on Women Reconsidered: Medieval Europe to Africa

2:45-3:00pm BREAK

3:00-4:30pm
Verónica A. Gutiérrez, History, Azusa Pacific University
Luther in the New World: Native People and Reformation in Sixteenth- Century New Spain

4:30-5:00 pm
Q and A for all panelists: The next steps in global Christian history

Anna Redhair is a second-year Masters student in the Baylor History Program. Her research focuses on medieval pilgrimage and women, and she will defend her thesis in April 2018.

Beth Allison Barr is an Associate Professor of History at Baylor University, where she also serves as the Graduate Program Director. She is a medieval historian, specializing in women and religion. Her first book, The Pastoral Care of Women in Late Medieval England, was published by Boydell in 2008 and she has completed a working draft of her second book project, Women in English Sermons 1350-1500. Out of the several articles she has written, her favorite comparing representations of Mary Magadalen in orthodox and heretical sermons was runner-up for the Jane Dempsey Douglas Prize in 2016. Her research has been generously supported by Baylor as well as by a Sabbatical Grant for Researchers from the Louisville Institute, and she is a regular writer for the Patheos blog The Anxious Bench.

Verónica A. Gutiérrez is an Associate Professor of Latin American History and Director of Undergraduate Research at Azusa Pacific University. She is the first Latin American specialist at APU. Her training in Colonial Mexico, Mesoamerican Cultures, Medieval Castile, Franciscan Spirituality, and the Early Modern Catholic World landed her a position as an Internationalization Faculty Fellow in APU’s Center for Global Learning and Engagement, where she worked toward improving student experience, particularly during the Semester in Ecuador.
Gutiérrez’s own research examines the development of indigenous-Christianity in sixteenth-century Mexico, especially by native peoples ministered by Franciscans. This work finds voice in her book project, Converting a Sacred City: Franciscans, Nahuas, and Spaniards in San Pedro Cholula, 1528-1648. Of her publications, “Quetzalcoatl’s Enlightened City: A Close Reading of Bernard Picart’s Engraving of Cholollan/Cholula,” received the Hubert Herring Award from the Pacific Coast Council on Latin American Studies. She has received a variety of institutional research support, including from Fulbright, the Ford Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, Spain’s Ministry of Culture, the Academy of American Franciscan History, the Latin American Institute at UCLA, the Faculty Research Council at APU, and the Graves Award in the Humanities.