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The Coptic Christian Tradition Workshop

When:
February 6, 2019 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
2019-02-06T10:00:00-01:00
2019-02-06T17:00:00-01:00
Where:
Treasure Room, Armstrong Browning Library, Baylor University
Cost:
Free

Egypt’s Coptic Christians are heirs to one of the very earliest and most creative traditions of the faith. Christianity’s roots in Egypt date to the first century, and for centuries afterwards Egypt was distinguished for its flourishing achievements in Christian literature, art, architecture and spirituality. In its time, the Coptic language was one of the most significant vehicles for Christian thought and debate. Our workshop on The Coptic Christian Tradition looks at various aspects of the splendid story, past and present.

10-11 am – “Making Christian Egypt: Myths and Debates” Philip Jenkins, Institute for Studies of Religion, Baylor University

11-12 pm – “Women, Laughter, and Popular Theater: The Role of Humor in Early Egyptian Monasticism”, Paul Dilley, Associate Professor of Ancient Mediterranean Religions, Departments of Religious Studies and Classics, University of Iowa. Author of Monasteries and the Care of Souls in Late Antique Christianity (2017)

12-1.30pm –  BREAK FOR LUNCH

1.30-2.30 pm – “The Red Monastery Church: Egypt and the Mediterranean in the Fifth and Sixth Centuries”, Elizabeth Bolman, Elsie B. Smith Professor in the Liberal Arts, Chair of Department of Art History and Art, Case Western University. Editor, The Red Monastery Church: Beauty and Asceticism in Upper Egypt  (2016)

2.30-2.45 pm BREAK

2.45-3.45 pm “Who are Copts? Reflections from the Past and Present”, Febe Armanios, Associate Professor of History at Middlebury College. Author of Coptic Christianity in Ottoman Egypt (2011)

3.45 pm  General Discussion, Q&A