Baylor ISR video- Juan Carlos Esparza Ochoa Lecture - "Religion and development in #Mexico over a hundred years"… https://t.co/EZP3kUhdNA
Mark's Ending and the Resurrection https://t.co/7O4odsgFB7 Philip Jenkins via @PatheosEvang @anxious_bench
Verónica A. Gutiérrez, "Luther in the New World: Native People and Reformation in Sixteenth- Century New Spain" - B… https://t.co/81DLpAVRoI
Is Islam Receptive to Religious Freedom? https://t.co/4jwUlPZlZD Paul Marshall, via @CTMagazine
CFP: @BaylorIFL symposium Oct. 2019 "The Character of the University" https://t.co/fZBO3coDVo
“God Friended Me,” Sexuality, and the Black Church https://t.co/bdv3sGgEsW Thomas Kidd, @TGC
#Pakistan watchdog decries forced conversions, curbs on media https://t.co/p5sPvHIX8w @Crux
Character Strength Interventions in Adolescents - grant application deadline May 1 https://t.co/RGRi1aHqbY @DrSchnitker @BaylorOVPR
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George Yancey Lecture - "Investigating Political Tolerance at Conservative Protestant Colleges and Universities"- I… https://t.co/y8SQ78xaRO

The Coptic Christian Tradition Workshop

When:
February 6, 2019 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
2019-02-06T10:00:00-01:00
2019-02-06T17:00:00-01:00
Where:
Treasure Room, Armstrong Browning Library, Baylor University
Cost:
Free

Egypt’s Coptic Christians are heirs to one of the very earliest and most creative traditions of the faith. Christianity’s roots in Egypt date to the first century, and for centuries afterwards Egypt was distinguished for its flourishing achievements in Christian literature, art, architecture and spirituality. In its time, the Coptic language was one of the most significant vehicles for Christian thought and debate. Our workshop on The Coptic Christian Tradition looks at various aspects of the splendid story, past and present.

10-11 am – “Making Christian Egypt: Myths and Debates” Philip Jenkins, Institute for Studies of Religion, Baylor University

11-12 pm – “Women, Laughter, and Popular Theater: The Role of Humor in Early Egyptian Monasticism”, Paul Dilley, Associate Professor of Ancient Mediterranean Religions, Departments of Religious Studies and Classics, University of Iowa. Author of Monasteries and the Care of Souls in Late Antique Christianity (2017)

12-1.30pm –  BREAK FOR LUNCH

1.30-2.30 pm – “The Red Monastery Church: Egypt and the Mediterranean in the Fifth and Sixth Centuries”, Elizabeth Bolman, Elsie B. Smith Professor in the Liberal Arts, Chair of Department of Art History and Art, Case Western University. Editor, The Red Monastery Church: Beauty and Asceticism in Upper Egypt  (2016)

2.30-2.45 pm BREAK

2.45-3.45 pm “Who are Copts? Reflections from the Past and Present”, Febe Armanios, Associate Professor of History at Middlebury College. Author of Coptic Christianity in Ottoman Egypt (2011)

3.45 pm  General Discussion, Q&A