On Writing the History of the 21st Century https://t.co/tqe0081ZQd Philip Jenkins via @JohnFea1
Grant Wacker Lecture from ISR's Billy Graham Symposium, Nov. 6, 2018 https://t.co/prLFOKfq4M @DukeDivinity
On Writing (Very) Modern History https://t.co/BzFs2Pyblw Philip Jenkins via @anxious_bench @PatheosEvang
.@Baylor Professor John Haldane Named as One of “Fifty Minds that Matter” by Roman Catholic Periodical… https://t.co/GB7lcZk0RN
Wang Yi, one of China's best-known Protestant pastors, was charged with "inciting subversion of state power," a sig… https://t.co/sg6GW2PF0H
Mediterranean maelstrom: The ideas that formed in the Second Temple period - John Barton reviews Philip Jenkins's C… https://t.co/HJeSC3PZ2G
Chinese police raid prominent house church - @WORLD_mag https://t.co/NQ5wYIwKGM
Where next for contemporary worship music? https://t.co/VIwgFhnDKH @churchtimes on the work of @Baylor's Dr. Monique Ingalls @OUPReligion
A new charter restates America’s commitment to freedom of religion and conscience, writes @BillGalstonhttps://t.co/ZmqqSPApyI
Jemar Tisby lecture at #Baylor Jan. 17 - "How to Fight Racism" https://t.co/SE2t5cd9BQ @JemarTisby @TheWitnessBCC

Religious Freedom and the Common Good : The spring symposium of the University of St. Thomas Law Journal

When:
March 23, 2018 @ 9:00 am – 4:25 pm
2018-03-23T09:00:00-01:00
2018-03-23T16:25:00-01:00
Where:
University of St. Thomas School of Law

This event is cosponsored by the Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion; the University of St. Thomas Murphy Institute for Catholic Thought, Law, and Public Policy; and the Georgetown Religious Freedom Institute.

Challenges to religious freedom have become more prominent and intense in recent years, both in the U.S. and abroad. The conflicts involve both individuals and nonprofit religious organizations, of varying faiths, and laws on matters from nondiscrimination to healthcare to national security. Arguments over these questions typically treat religious freedom as a matter of personal individual autonomy. But religious freedom may have another important dimension: the common good. Indeed, in an era of increasing skepticism toward many religious-freedom claims, the defense of religious freedom may increasingly rely on showing that it preserves space for religious groups to benefit individuals and society.

Social scientists have done considerable research on the asserted contributions of religion and religious organizations for individual believers, for recipients of social services, and for society. But what are these contributions, and how well established are they? Moreover, what relationship do they have to religious freedom in the American tradition? Can religious freedom be justified in part based on its contributions to the common good, and how would such arguments affect the scope of religious freedom?

To address these questions, this conference brings leading social scientists together with a variety of legal scholars, advocates, and policy experts. Among the topics will be the contributions of religious organizations to social services, the founders’ views of religion’s societal effects, the benefits and risks of religious freedom for African-Americans, the role of religious freedom in countering terrorism, and the causes and consequences of religious-freedom restrictions in various nations.

Conference papers will be published in the University of St. Thomas Law Journal and, in shorter form, in other venues.

 

All programs offered by the University of St. Thomas shall be readily accessible to individuals with disabilities. For details, call (651) 962-6315.