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Jason Riley Lecture

When:
November 13, 2019 @ 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm
2019-11-13T15:30:00-06:00
2019-11-13T17:00:00-06:00
Where:
Baylor University - TBA

Inequality, Ethics, and Black Political Power

The lecture is about social inequality in the U.S. and why black political success–which now includes a twice-elected black president–has not translated into more black economic advancement.

Jason Riley is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a columnist for the Wall Street Journal, where he has published opinion pieces for more than 20 years. Topics include politics, economics, education, immigration and race, among others. He’s also a frequent public speaker and provides commentary for Fox News, ABC, NBC, CNN, PBS, NPR and other news outlets.

After joining the Journal in 1994, he was named a senior editorial page writer in 2000 and a member of the Editorial Board in 2005. He joined the Manhattan Institute, a public policy think tank focused on urban issues, in 2015. In 2008 he published Let Them In, which argues for a more free-market oriented U.S. immigration system. His second book, Please Stop Helping Us, which is about the track record of government efforts to help the black underclass, was published in 2014. His most recent book, False Black Power?, is an assessment of why black political success has not translated into more economic advancement and was published in 2017.

Born in Buffalo, N.Y., Riley earned a bachelor’s degree in English from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He has also worked for USA Today and the Buffalo News. He lives in suburban New York City.