Ben Franklin and George Whitefield Debate the Purpose of Education | @ThomasSKidd @TGC https://t.co/jIDGKmKXY5
Fundamentalism, Feminism, and Other Curse Words: Teaching Controversy with Civility https://t.co/g58tPieEXS @AndreaLTurpin @USReligionBlog
Christians, in an Epochal Shift, Are Leaving the Middle East - @WSJ https://t.co/vFTab78dpk
the smell of strawmen burning – @ayjay on arguing with Rusty Reno https://t.co/vFATcbyaS0
'Sad, but Not Unhappy': J.R.R. Tolkien's Sorrowful Vision of Joy – Ralph Wood https://t.co/KIzplAw1zV
Ten anti-Catholic calumnies refuted - Piers Paul Read on Rodney Stark's Bearing False Witness https://t.co/dB65XxubsM @StandpointMag
Five Things You Should Know About Reinhold Niebuhr | Elesha Coffman, @CTmagazine https://t.co/LmZJaOdFHO
Alternative Scriptures: Which Old Testament? https://t.co/ZisrCfHHYS Philip Jenkins, @anxious_bench
Should Donald Trump Be Removed from Office? | Thomas Kidd @TGC https://t.co/gRwqnyasNd
Thomas Kidd talks about 'Benjamin Franklin: The Religious Life of a Founding Father' with the @mattklewis podcast https://t.co/riLBUxxHZb

For God and Country: The United States and the Great War 1917-18

When:
April 5, 2017 all-day
2017-04-05T00:00:00+00:00
2017-04-06T00:00:00+00:00
Where:
Cox Lecture Hall, Armstrong Browning Library, Baylor University
Cost:
Free
WWI

Spirit of 1917

World War I Symposium:

In April 1917, after passionate debate, the United States joined the First World War on the side of the Allied Powers. This decision was taken amidst fervent religious and patriotic rhetoric, and widespread confidence in the justice of the Allied cause. But the realities of war forced the country to revise its early optimism, so that later generations came to wonder whether American participation had been necessary or justified.

This seminar brings together scholars who will discuss aspects of the American wartime experience. In particular, they will describe the debates over the justice of the war effort, and the whole concept of Christian warfare.

10:30 am   Philip Jenkins lecture – “Merchants of Death and Dreams of Peace: How Americans Came to Condemn the Great War”
Philip Jenkins is Distinguished Professor of History at Baylor University, and the author of The Great and Holy War (2014)

2:00 pm   Barry Hankins lecture –   “From Westminster to Versailles: Woodrow Wilson in the Aftermath of WWI”
Barry Hankins is history professor and chair of the department of history, Baylor University, and the author of Woodrow Wilson: Ruling Elder, Spiritual President (2016).

3:30 pm  Jonathan Ebel lecture – “Thou Shalt Kill: American Christians, European Weapons, and the Sanctification of Killing in the Great War”
Jonathan H. Ebel is associate professor of religion at the University of Illinois. He is the author of Faith in the Fight: Religion and the American Solider in the Great War (Princeton, 2010) and G.I. Messiahs: Soldiering, War, and American Civil Religion (Yale, 2015). He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.