Call for Applications: Religious Freedom Research Project Graduate Summer Research Fellowship… https://t.co/0EMx5827Pf
David Brainerd’s 300th Birthday https://t.co/DPWKtPmmFZ Thomas Kidd, @TGC
Puritans, Baptists, and the Powers of Darkness - ISR symposium Apr. 18 featuring Crawford Gribben and Philip Jenkins https://t.co/akhaMludyU
Five Great Books on African American Evangelical History - Thomas Kidd @TGC https://t.co/rDfrYw545M
On Getting Churches Totally Wrong https://t.co/p47UX5ZQ9c Philip Jenkins via @anxious_bench @PatheosEvang
The Dancer and the Hero https://t.co/SZPw32RgTh Philip Jenkins via @anxious_bench @PatheosEvang
The Story Behind ‘Paul, Apostle of Christ,’ by @MeanCharlotte - cites the work of ISR's Rodney Stark https://t.co/eTF387hEUQ via @WSJOpinion
Puritans, Baptists, and the Powers of Darkness - ISR symposium Apr. 18 featuring Crawford Gribben and Philip Jenkin… https://t.co/hElvfwY8jj
Western Christians’ Responses to Denials of Religious Freedom - Paul Marshall https://t.co/5jPd5qjgXd @drpaulmarshall @CaesarsSword
The distinctive faith of South America's Quechua Catholics https://t.co/kwJ1vlhPa1 Philip Jenkins via @ChristianCent

Brent Landau Lecture

When:
November 29, 2017 @ 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm
2017-11-29T15:30:00-01:00
2017-11-29T17:00:00-01:00
Where:
Cox Lecture Hall, Armstrong Browning Library, Baylor University
Cost:
Free

Christmas from the Wise Men’s Point of View: The Apocryphal Revelation of the Magi

The Revelation of the Magi is an apocryphal early Christian writing purporting to be the personal testimony of the Magi (better known as the “Wise Men” or the “Three Kings”) on the events surrounding the coming of Christ. It is by far the longest early Christian text devoted to these figures, and contains several fascinating interpretations of the biblical Magi story (Matthew 2:1-12) not seen elsewhere. In this text there are twelve Magi, or possibly more, in contrast to the traditional enumeration of three. They reside in a semi-mythical land in the Far East called “Shir”; and perhaps most startlingly, the Magi’s star is actually Jesus Christ himself, who transforms from star to human and back again throughout the narrative.

Brent Landau is a lecturer in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. He received his Th.D and M.Div from Harvard University, and a B.A. in Religious Studies from the University of Iowa. Brent’s chief research is on ancient Christian apocryphal writings, particularly traditions about Jesus’ birth and childhood and fragments of Christian Apocrypha preserved on papyri.