The Coptic Christian Tradition Workshop, Feb. 6 at Baylor, featuring presentations from Philip Jenkins, Paul Dilley… https://t.co/sXcODHp6U3
The Danger of Politicized Pastors https://t.co/Cn89nrdZo2 Thomas Kidd @TGC
Bad (Though Not Entirely Bad) Pro-Life Arguments https://t.co/TjjSn9eK3I @fbeckwith via @PublicDiscourse @WitherspoonInst
Coming on Thursday - @JemarTisby lecture at @Baylor - "How to Fight Racism" - register here to attend! https://t.co/R2vSn8oHG6
After 24 Years, Robert Alter Completes 3,000-Page Translation Of The Hebrew Bible https://t.co/NUj7mLMkQt @NPR
RFI Report Highlights the Critical Need for Decisive Action to Provide Security and Support for Religious Minority… https://t.co/BlcjWdjbs4
How high is your constitutional IQ? https://t.co/9zSo4SXs8q Philip Jenkins, @spectator
Remembering Gary Knoppers (1956-2018) https://t.co/awymHBTBlc Philip Jenkins via @anxious_bench @PatheosEvang
Missionaries from the global south try to save the godless West https://t.co/RmuC3wZiyl via @TheEconomist
One week from today: @JemarTisby lecture at @Baylor - "How to Fight Racism" https://t.co/R2vSn8oHG6 #ColorofCompromise

Calendar

Feb
6
Wed
2019
The Coptic Christian Tradition Workshop @ Treasure Room, Armstrong Browning Library, Baylor University
Feb 6 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

Egypt’s Coptic Christians are heirs to one of the very earliest and most creative traditions of the faith. Christianity’s roots in Egypt date to the first century, and for centuries afterwards Egypt was distinguished for its flourishing achievements in Christian literature, art, architecture and spirituality. In its time, the Coptic language was one of the most significant vehicles for Christian thought and debate. Our workshop on The Coptic Christian Tradition looks at various aspects of the splendid story, past and present.

10-11 am – “Making Christian Egypt: Myths and Debates” Philip Jenkins, Institute for Studies of Religion, Baylor University

11-12 pm – “Women, Laughter, and Popular Theater: The Role of Humor in Early Egyptian Monasticism”, Paul Dilley, Associate Professor of Ancient Mediterranean Religions, Departments of Religious Studies and Classics, University of Iowa. Author of Monasteries and the Care of Souls in Late Antique Christianity (2017)

12-1.30pm –  BREAK FOR LUNCH

1.30-2.30 pm – “The Red Monastery Church: Egypt and the Mediterranean in the Fifth and Sixth Centuries”, Elizabeth Bolman, Elsie B. Smith Professor in the Liberal Arts, Chair of Department of Art History and Art, Case Western University. Editor, The Red Monastery Church: Beauty and Asceticism in Upper Egypt  (2016)

2.30-2.45 pm BREAK

2.45-3.45 pm “Who are Copts? Reflections from the Past and Present”, Febe Armanios, Associate Professor of History at Middlebury College. Author of Coptic Christianity in Ottoman Egypt (2011)

3.45 pm  General Discussion, Q&A

Calendar