Becoming a More Sensible Evidentialist about Jesus - Stephen Wykstra lecture Aug. 22 https://t.co/Ofq9GfxUwK
The many resurrections of Chinese Christianity https://t.co/XXvKByoVkX Philip Jenkins @ChristianCent @iandenisjohnson
Russell Moore at #Baylor on Sept. 5, 3:30 - Is There a Future For Evangelical Cultural Engagement? https://t.co/MP4z4auWRv @drmoore
Check out the website for the newly-launched Baylor Center on Christian Philosophy https://t.co/DMvtVHqDhk
Rescuing Syriac Manuscripts in Iraq - The ASOR Blog https://t.co/wHcMzptt7d
Verdict on first religious freedom report under Trump: Great rhetoric, what do we do? https://t.co/cCiHXRhmGB @Crux @RFInstitute
Saving Christians from Genocide | William Doino Jr. | @firstthingsmag https://t.co/KNdvWKNNej
Russell Moore at #Baylor on Sept. 5, 3:30 - Is There a Future For Evangelical Cultural Engagement? https://t.co/MplHdi9FWW
Baylor Launches Center for Christian Philosophy | #Baylor University https://t.co/aRXOb93cuT via @baylorumedia
On white southern women who received publicity as "Christian athletes" well before Title IX https://t.co/mu7F8koPEs @sportianity @p_emory

Calendar

Aug
22
Tue
2017
Stephen Wykstra Lecture @ Treasure Room, Armstrong Browning Library, Reception to follow lecture in the Cox Lecture Hall, Baylor University
Aug 22 @ 5:15 pm – 7:30 pm

1 Wykstra IMG_0615 “Not Done in a Corner” Revisited:  Becoming a More Sensible Evidentialist about Jesus

In his 2000 book Warranted Christian Belief, Alvin Plantinga develops on “Aquinas/Calvin (or A/C) model” of how Christian knowledge about Jesus rests on ‘the inner instigation of the Holy Spirit” in such a way as to “swing free” of historical evidence and historical scholarship.   But when the apostle Paul began to tell King Agrippa about the resurrection of Jesus, we are told in Acts 26, the king’s right-hand man Festus went ballistic. “You are out of your mind,” Festus shouted, “your great learning is driving you insane!”  “Not so, most excellent Festus,” Paul is said to have replied, “What I am saying about Jesus’ resurrection is true and reasonable—for as the king knows, it was not done in a corner.”  How well does Plantinga’s model fit with this and other strands in the New Testament witness? “Not very well,” argued Wykstra in his 2002 paper “Not Done in a Corner: How to be a Sensible Evidentialist about Jesus,” where Wykstra proposed a  “sensible evidentialist” alternative to Plantinga’s account.  In this new paper, Wykstra takes measure of Plantinga’s reply to his 2002 proposal, seeking to make it an even more sensible evidentialist alternative to Plantinga’s A/C model.

Last year Stephen Wykstra retired after 31 years of service in the philosophy department of Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Michigan.  For a time there he was a direct colleague of Alvin Plantinga, but their association runs deep indeed.  After earning a degree in Philosophy and Physics at Hope College, he went on to do a PhD in the renowned History and Philosophy of Science program at the University of Pittsburgh.  He has been a National Science Foundation Fellow, Visiting Research Fellow at the Center for Philosophy of Science, a National Endowment for the Humanities fellow, an SCR fellow at Oriel College, Oxford, a Senior Fellow at the Notre Dame Center for Philosophy of Religion, and last year was the Plantinga Fellow there. He has been a central contributor to the academic discussion of the problem of evil for the last  thirty three years.  In his retirement, he is deepening and broadening many of the themes he has explored throughout his career.

A reception in the Cox Reception Hall will follow the lecture.

Sep
5
Tue
2017
Russell Moore Lecture @ Waco Hall, Baylor University
Sep 5 @ 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm

Is There a Future For Evangelical Cultural Engagement?russellheadshot180

As the cultural and political world around us continues to shift in rapid and unexpected ways, what does this mean for evangelical witness? With each new day comes unexpected societal turns, questions previous generations of Christians never even had to consider, and societal costs for those who pledge allegiance to the cross and to the Kingdom of Christ. How can a gospel-resurgent evangelicalism refine itself to speak with neither perpetual outrage nor doctrinal capitulation?

Russell Moore (Ph.D., Southern Seminary) is president of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention, the moral and public policy agency of the nation’s largest Protestant denomination. The Wall Street Journal has called him “vigorous, cheerful, and fiercely articulate.”

Prior to his election to this role in 2013, Moore served as provost and dean of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, where he also taught as professor of theology and ethics.

Moore is the author of several books, including Onward: Engaging the Culture without Losing the GospelTempted and Tried: Temptation and the Triumph of Christ and Adopted for Life: The Priority of Adoption for Christian Families & Churches. He also hosts Signposts, a weekly podcast on the gospel and culture.

A native Mississippian, he and his wife Maria are the parents of five boys.

Sep
19
Tue
2017
Paul Marshall Lecture @ Cox Lecture Hall, Armstrong Browning Library, Baylor University
Sep 19 @ 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm

Blasphemy and Other Threats to Freedom of Religion and Speech

A major, current, worldwide threat to religious freedom, freedom of speech and the press, is attempts to stifle religious and political discussion in the name of preventing insults to religion. This pertains to all religions but is now especially prevalent with respect to Islam. The twenty-first century has witnessed repeated eruptions of violence worldwide and such matters are now in the news every week.

Most victims fall into four basic categories. 1. “Post-Islamic” faiths. Baha’is and Ahmadis, interpretations that arose after Islam, are often condemned en masse.  2. A second is apostates–those who leave Islam for another religion, or none, as well as atheists. 3. A third is Muslims of the ‘wrong type’ in the ‘wrong place.’ Shia may be accused in Sunni-majority countries, and Sunnis in Shia settings, while there attacks on Sufis.  4. The fourth major category is Muslim religious and political reformers and dissidents, both in the Muslim-majority world and in the West. There is a larger silencing is among those who, mindful of attacks on others, refrain from expressing any controversial views.

The freedom to debate or criticize religious ideas is an essential element of religious freedom and other freedoms. As the late Abdurrahman Wahid stated “Coercively applied blasphemy laws “narrow the bounds of acceptable discourse…. about vast spheres of life, literature, science and culture….” When politics and religion are intertwined, as they necessarily are in debates about blasphemy, without religious debate and critique there can be no political debate and critique.

Internationally acclaimed scholar Paul Marshall, Ph.D., is the Baylor University holder of the Jerry and Susie Wilson Chair in Religious Freedom at the Institute for Studies of Religion (ISR). Marshall also serves as a research professor within Baylor’s department of political science. Marshall’s current research is focused primarily on understanding how Muslims and Christians are able to live and work together peacefully in Indonesia‚  the worlds most populous Muslim country. Marshall is in frequent demand for lectures and media appearances and has been featured on ABC Nightly News; CNN; PBS; FOX; the British, Australian, Canadian, South African and Japanese Broadcasting Corporations; and Al Jazeera. His work has been published in, or is the subject of, articles in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, The Washington Times, The Boston Globe, The Dallas Morning News, The Christian Science Monitor, First Things, New Republic, The Weekly Standard, Readers Digest and many other newspapers and magazines.

Nov
14
Tue
2017
Richard Asante Lecture @ Cox Lecture Hall, Armstrong Browning Library, Baylor University
Nov 14 @ 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm

The Role of Religion in Electoral Politics in Ghana and America: The Surprising Similarities.mr_richard_asante 2_1(1)

In this talk, Asante examines the role of religion (Christian) in electoral politics in Ghana and America during the 2016 Elections. He will present preliminary findings on ongoing research project on religion and electoral politics in Ghana and America. He demonstrates that despite the separation of religion from the state, religion played an important role in the 2016 Elections in Ghana and America. He concludes by looking at the implications for the future of democracy in Ghana and America.

Dr. Richard Asante a Senior Research Fellow and Lecturer in the Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana, Legon. Asante holds a PhD in Political Science under the Harvard University, Boston (USA) and University of Ghana Split-PhD Program. He previously served as the Head of Department and Research Coordinator of the History and Politics Unit of the Institute of African Studies from August 2014 to July 2016.  Asante teaches courses in comparative politics of Africa, peace and security in Africa and political economy of African development at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. He has special research interest in democratization, social capital and religion and politics. Asante has received a number of awards and fellowships. He was a Resident Scholar in International Relations at Pomona College, Claremont, USA during the 2016-2017 academic year where he taught courses in comparative politics of Africa and peace and security in Africa. He previously served as a Visiting Scholar at the New School University, New York (2004); Oxford University, UK (2005), University of Cape Town (UCT), South Africa; and Northwestern University, Evanston, USA (2012-2013). Asante is the Regional Manager for West Africa in the Varieties of Democracy Project (V-DEM) based in the University of Gothenburg, Sweden researching into alternative ways of measuring democracy globally. He is also a Mo Ibrahim Scholar of African Governance and Development; and Afrobarometer Scholar, and Associate member of the Afrobarometer Research Team, Ghana under the auspices of the Ghana Center for Democracy and Development (CDD-Ghana).

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