Decadent Societies: A Conversation with Ross Douthat | @Baylor Mar. 5 https://t.co/PSIn5kA5I1 @DouthatNYT @BaylorOVPR @BaylorIFL @GreatTexts
.@Google Should Remove Indonesian Government App for Reporting Heresy https://t.co/zzDuORt8gH via @RFInstitute #Indonesia #religiousliberty
Congratulations to @KatherineEliseL for her new _Church History_ article on Sunday Schools and the Roles of Childh… https://t.co/nETQQ6Cjbv
The Wisdom of God Manifested in the Works of Creation https://t.co/q3CNQiOFSy Philip Jenkins via @anxious_bench @PatheosEvang
So far at pope’s anti-abuse summit, survivors are stealing the show https://t.co/UWisRQOevl @JohnLAllenJr via @Crux
Black History Month Lecture Feb. 21 - American Prophet: The Inner Life and Global Vision of Martin Luther King, Jr.… https://t.co/Y3FeK8cgmX
Mar. 5 at @Baylor - Decadent Societies: A Conversation with Ross Douthat and Alan Jacobs https://t.co/PSIn5kA5I1 @DouthatNYT
A Baptist Abolitionist Appeals to Thomas Jefferson https://t.co/GLvuVye9lI Thomas Kidd, @TGC
Call for proposals for the 2019 #BaylorSFC "The Character of the University" Learn more: https://t.co/2G80MPwRKM @BaylorIFL
The Forgotten Temple https://t.co/0fRo1pFzt5 Philip Jenkins via @anxious_bench @PatheosEvang

Juan Carlos Esparza Ochoa

Research Assistant Professor
School of Social Work & Institute for Studies of Religion
Director, Program on Religion and Latin American Studies
Institute for Studies of Religion

Email Juan Carlos Esparza Ochoa

 

Juan Carlos Esparza Ochoa joined Baylor in February 2019  as Research Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work and the Director of the Program on Religion and Latin America Studies in the Institute for Studies of Religion. He has researched and taught about religion in Latin America for the past eighteen years and is co-director of the Project on Religion and Economic Change (PREC). As part of PREC, he attempts to measure the impact of Protestant and Catholic pastoral care, missionary activity, and humanitarian work on education, health, economic development, and political outcomes around the world over the past two centuries. This required developing techniques to link consistent data from diverse historical sources over such a long period of time – something that stymied previous scholarship on long-term development. As part of this project he also linked 120 years of Mexican census data to understand what factors influenced the life conditions of poor and marginalized communities over the long term. For seven years he managed data for global religious demography projects at the Pew Research Center. Prior to earning his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Texas at Austin, he did ethnographic research about Afro-Caribbean religious movements in Cuba and worked with Mexican indigenous communities in the Sierra Papanteca, the Huasteca Potosina & the Nayar.