.@profyancey explores what it means to live in a "Post-Christian" world and the prevalence of anti-Christian bias… https://t.co/WGYiS8YRyp
Evangelicals and the Bible: A Symposium to Honor David Bebbington - at #Baylor Sept. 19-20 https://t.co/KIhnYfaZYE… https://t.co/IVMHvui4Za
Philip Jenkins shares his thoughts about witch craft and the modern West on @anxious_bench https://t.co/HreGVKLiGx
ISR is thrilled to welcome NY Times Op-Ed columnist @nytdavidbrooks to campus on September 23rd for a conversation… https://t.co/QkWbg6D0Ew
Habits of Mind in an Age of Distraction https://t.co/xCanNMWMLp Alan Jacobs @cardusca
Back to school reading on your mind? Ours too! Go ahead and add ISR fellow Dr. Jenkins’s new book “Rethinking A Nat… https://t.co/uH2IY7MwjN
Baylor ISR is excited that the administrative headquarters for the Baptist Scholars International Roundtable have m… https://t.co/AUUkxFcmbX
Cardinal Nasrallah, a patriarch in the Lebanese church, was a great example of an interfaith leader who successfull… https://t.co/HO2I1L3vqs
Register here for "Evangelicals and the Bible: A Symposium to Honor David Bebbington" Sept. 19-20 at #Baylor https://t.co/RRknD6V8oP

Juan Carlos Esparza Ochoa

Research Assistant Professor
School of Social Work & Institute for Studies of Religion
Director, Program on Religion and Latin American Studies
Institute for Studies of Religion

Email Juan Carlos Esparza Ochoa

 

Juan Carlos Esparza Ochoa joined Baylor in February 2019  as Research Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work and the Director of the Program on Religion and Latin America Studies in the Institute for Studies of Religion. He has researched and taught about religion in Latin America for the past eighteen years and is co-director of the Project on Religion and Economic Change (PREC). As part of PREC, he attempts to measure the impact of Protestant and Catholic pastoral care, missionary activity, and humanitarian work on education, health, economic development, and political outcomes around the world over the past two centuries. This required developing techniques to link consistent data from diverse historical sources over such a long period of time – something that stymied previous scholarship on long-term development. As part of this project he also linked 120 years of Mexican census data to understand what factors influenced the life conditions of poor and marginalized communities over the long term. For seven years he managed data for global religious demography projects at the Pew Research Center. Prior to earning his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Texas at Austin, he did ethnographic research about Afro-Caribbean religious movements in Cuba and worked with Mexican indigenous communities in the Sierra Papanteca, the Huasteca Potosina & the Nayar.