Ten Reasons We Need Rigorous Research on Effective Compassion, by Byron Johnson – University of St. Thomas Law Jour… https://t.co/nAE8hSpvGb
New History Textbook Grapples with America’s Complex Religious History https://t.co/cyJa5SoTXw @ThomasSKiddhttps://t.co/72kZKsSNEV
Losing the Faith: Of Apostates, Renegades, and Traitors https://t.co/Fe6Y6MY5Vp Philip Jenkins via @anxious_bench @PatheosEvang
God imagery and affective outcomes in a spiritually integrative inpatient program https://t.co/4zBryktmwP article f… https://t.co/EY2ziBv6i1
Understanding the debate over married priests at the Amazon synod https://t.co/Jdv2hhmFvZ via @Crux @JohnLAllenJr
How safe are congregations and clergy from automation? https://t.co/9xCBT8Xl2r from the latest issue of Baylor ISR… https://t.co/Eq6BqNEhtG
When Hollywood and Big Business Attack https://t.co/JUZGrLgwBU via @profyancey
Robert Kagan and the Many Meanings of Liberalism https://t.co/vw4EFEriij via @ProvMagazine @drpaulmarshall
Translation and Paraphrase https://t.co/DVpW6ortJ7 Philip Jenkins via @anxious_bench @PatheosEvang
How Churches Can Bridge the Marriage Divide | @FactsAndTrends @WilcoxNMP https://t.co/t98QVjWext

Juan Carlos Esparza Ochoa

Research Assistant Professor
School of Social Work & Institute for Studies of Religion
Director, Program on Religion and Latin American Studies
Institute for Studies of Religion

Email Juan Carlos Esparza Ochoa

 

Juan Carlos Esparza Ochoa joined Baylor in February 2019  as Research Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work and the Director of the Program on Religion and Latin America Studies in the Institute for Studies of Religion. He has researched and taught about religion in Latin America for the past eighteen years and is co-director of the Project on Religion and Economic Change (PREC). As part of PREC, he attempts to measure the impact of Protestant and Catholic pastoral care, missionary activity, and humanitarian work on education, health, economic development, and political outcomes around the world over the past two centuries. This required developing techniques to link consistent data from diverse historical sources over such a long period of time – something that stymied previous scholarship on long-term development. As part of this project he also linked 120 years of Mexican census data to understand what factors influenced the life conditions of poor and marginalized communities over the long term. For seven years he managed data for global religious demography projects at the Pew Research Center. Prior to earning his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Texas at Austin, he did ethnographic research about Afro-Caribbean religious movements in Cuba and worked with Mexican indigenous communities in the Sierra Papanteca, the Huasteca Potosina & the Nayar.