A British Baptist on the Civil War and Slavery https://t.co/lyr92UPz5g Thomas Kidd, @TGC
Christianity and National Security - @ProvMagazine conference Nov. 2 and 3 https://t.co/Q3WGGOVxxe talks by Paul M… https://t.co/jXKFF5Ymel
Will the Trump presidency lead to renewed dialogue between Catholics and Evangelicals? https://t.co/FE6aUSaxxn @mattleeanderson
Register now for Billy Graham Symposium Nov. 6-7 at #Baylor | sponsored by ISR, @TruettSeminary and @BaylorHistoryhttps://t.co/u4SJ96r07i
Commemorating the 20th Anniversary of the International Religious Freedom Act https://t.co/MLpBgEe0Yp Nov. 9 in Was… https://t.co/ZvZTo12fp1
"Blasphemy and Other Threats to Freedom of Religion and Speech" @drpaulmarshall ISR video https://t.co/UxC6vBpstO #AsiaBibi
Pakistan may execute a 53-year-old woman for being Christian, writes @dhume https://t.co/6rRLG0vJdu via @WSJOpinion
Counting Believers https://t.co/b1nZIJefzA Philip Jenkins via @anxious_bench @PatheosEvang
Take & read: New books in global Christianity - Philip Jenkins @ChristianCent https://t.co/dU0oihaFiC @BUHistory @BaylorHistory
ISR’s Rebecca Shah releases new book; “Christianity in India: Conversion, Community Development, and Religious Free… https://t.co/ubFp5PYrs9

Kidd’s Benjamin Franklin makes Russell Moore’s top 10 list

11) Thomas S. Kidd, Benjamin Franklin: The Religious Life of a Founding Father (Yale University Press)

I’ve long said that the cultural Christianity around us often resembles the religion of Benjamin Franklin rather than that of his friend and contemporary George Whitefield. This book explores Franklin’s complicated religion, one that, with its rejection of personal regeneration and its acceptance of a providential role for the United States, came in many ways to dominate the civil religion we can see all around us. Kidd’s work succeeds no matter what he writes about because he combines rigorous scholarship with an almost novelistic writing-style that can speak to the imagination as well as to the intellect.

My favorite passage is the closing one, as Kidd portrays a dying Franklin in a room with a painting of the Matthew 25 scene of Jesus dividing the sheep from the goats at his Judgment Seat: “What was going on in Franklin’s mind, as he gazed at God separating the saved and the damned? To the end, Franklin’s faith was enigmatic. It was clear that by the end of his life, he affirmed God’s Providence, and God’s future rewards and punishments. But after a lifetime of questions…doubts still lingered. He had sought to live by a code of Christian ethics. But had he fully lived up to them? The doctor believed that those who enter heaven must do so by their virtue. But he knew that the Calvinist questioners saw this as false hope. No one merited salvation by their goodness, they said. They thought Franklin was wrong. He thought they were wrong. And so, Franklin waited, with ragged breathing, eyes fixed on the painting.”

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