Oct. 4 at @Baylor - Drumwright Family Lecture featuring Robert P. George (Princeton University) and Shaykh Hamza Yu… https://t.co/O7bMBCYyzC
The Paradox of American Religion and American Secularism https://t.co/EvX1oJiquR Thomas Kidd @TGC
China on My Mind: Why We All Must Care about Our Suffering Brothers and Sisters https://t.co/fgTn4d3pug via @CTmagazine @edstetzer
Oliver O’Donovan lecture tonight at #Baylor https://t.co/FSGtGylVhM
Art, Liturgy, and Eternity https://t.co/tYtQ87DxPM Philip Jenkins via @anxious_bench @PatheosEvang
Social Justice in the Shadows https://t.co/XO6bxLzEva @clayroutledge via @QuilletteM
The Common Good – Does it Amount to a Political Programme? - Oliver O'Donovan lecture at #Baylor Sept. 17 https://t.co/lWQngn5K6t
Charles Edmondson Historical Lecture Series Highlights ‘The Culture Wars in American History’ | @RMarieGriffith to… https://t.co/E12q4jAKCG

Philip Jenkins’ new book “Crucible of Faith” reviewed by Kirkus

Screen Shot 2017-08-02 at 1.49.33 PM

CRUCIBLE OF FAITH

The Ancient Revolution that Made Our Modern Religious World

KIRKUS REVIEW

An exploration of an underrated era and its effect on religious history.

Crucible of Faith“The two or three centuries before Jesus’s time witnessed an extraordinary cultural and religious revolution,” writes Jenkins (History/Institute for Studies of Religion, Baylor Univ.; The Many Faces of Christ: The Thousand-Year Story of the Survival and Influence of the Lost Gospels, 2015, etc.), “but that transformation is still barely acknowledged in historical writing, still less in popular perceptions.” The author dubs this time period the “Crucible era” and valiantly attempts to undo that lack of academic and popular acknowledgement. Without this important era in Jewish and Hellenic history, argues Jenkins, the Abrahamic religions as we know them today would not exist, and all of history for the past two millennia would have been vastly different. The two to three centuries before the birth of Jesus were drastically violent and unsettled for the people of Palestine and nearby areas, as Greek influences overwhelmed the region, meeting with local resistance and, eventually, subsiding due to Roman expansion. However, historical writings about this era have either been relegated to the Apocrypha or were in many cases lost for centuries, making for scant awareness of this era’s importance. Jenkins provides necessary historical context before examining both the political/military and the literary/scriptural legacies of the times. He recounts the power of the Greek Empire over the Jewish people and the subsequent rise in resentment at corrupt puppet leaders such as Jason, high priest from 175 to 172 B.C.E., who rose to power through pure corruption. Alongside histories of the crucible era’s politics, Jenkins discusses the literary monuments they spawned. Chief among these were 1 Enoch, a fascinating work, which, Jenkins suggests, invented the concept of a burning hell as we know it; and the better known book of Daniel, the archetype of apocalyptic literature.

A well-written, intriguing account of the centuries that set the stage for modern Judaism, the Christianity taught by Paul, and, eventually, Islam as an heir to both.