8 recent films that take on the church https://t.co/nEyRCDPfad Philip Jenkins via @ChristianCent
Rodney Stark lecture - End of Religion? conference - "A Godless World?" https://t.co/xDZJTTLcle
Can evangelicals and academics talk to each other? https://t.co/VmwQoTtKPG @ayjay via @WSJ
Baylor ISR: Russell Moore: Is There a Future For Evangelical Cultural Engagement? - YouTube https://t.co/4QDJUBsn7x @drmoore @ERLC
Dispatch from Berkeley: Smoke Gets in Your Eyes https://t.co/zY7gC6btWY Elesha Coffman, @USReligionBlog
View Jeff Levin’s lecture on religion and public health at @HRSatHarvard https://t.co/InBEQHTQls
Baylor Symposium on Faith and Culture Will Commemorate the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation https://t.co/CEwLTDzLL1 @BaylorIFL
Richard Asante Lecture Nov. 14 - The Role of Religion in Electoral Politics in Ghana and America https://t.co/EItwFKOF6K
Romans 8:31, Chris Tomlin, And The Faith Of A Medieval Woman https://t.co/3h8TIn9Dye @bethallisonbarr @anxious_bench

John G. Turner Lecture – A Tale of Two Brigham Youngs: The Mormon Journey from Illinois to Utah


CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE VIDEO OF THIS LECTURE


October 17, 2012
3:30 p.m.
Kayser Auditorium

Professor John G. Turner, author of the book Brigham Young: Pioneer Prophet,  is Professor of Religious Studies at George Mason.

Professor Turner will lecture on his new book – Brigham Young: Pioneer Prophet.

Brigham Young was a rough-hewn craftsman from New York whose impoverished and obscure life was electrified by the Mormon faith. He trudged around the United States and England to gain converts for Mormonism, spoke in spiritual tongues, married more than fifty women, and eventually transformed a barren desert into his vision of the Kingdom of God. While previous accounts of his life have been distorted by hagiography or polemical exposé, John G. Turner provides a fully realized portrait of a colossal figure in American religion, politics, and westward expansion.

After the 1844 murder of Mormon founder Joseph Smith, Young gathered those Latter-day Saints who would follow him and led them over the Rocky Mountains. In Utah, he styled himself after the patriarchs, judges, and prophets of ancient Israel. As charismatic as he was autocratic, he was viewed by his followers as an indispensable protector and by his opponents as a theocratic, treasonous heretic.

Under his fiery tutelage, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints defended plural marriage, restricted the place of African Americans within the church, fought the U.S. Army in 1857, and obstructed federal efforts to prosecute perpetrators of the Mountain Meadows Massacre. At the same time, Young’s tenacity and faith brought tens of thousands of Mormons to the American West, imbued their everyday lives with sacred purpose, and sustained his church against adversity. Turner reveals the complexity of this spiritual prophet, whose commitment made a deep imprint on his church and the American Mountain West.