Ben Franklin and George Whitefield Debate the Purpose of Education | @ThomasSKidd @TGC https://t.co/jIDGKmKXY5
Fundamentalism, Feminism, and Other Curse Words: Teaching Controversy with Civility https://t.co/g58tPieEXS @AndreaLTurpin @USReligionBlog
Christians, in an Epochal Shift, Are Leaving the Middle East - @WSJ https://t.co/vFTab78dpk
the smell of strawmen burning – @ayjay on arguing with Rusty Reno https://t.co/vFATcbyaS0
'Sad, but Not Unhappy': J.R.R. Tolkien's Sorrowful Vision of Joy – Ralph Wood https://t.co/KIzplAw1zV
Ten anti-Catholic calumnies refuted - Piers Paul Read on Rodney Stark's Bearing False Witness https://t.co/dB65XxubsM @StandpointMag
Five Things You Should Know About Reinhold Niebuhr | Elesha Coffman, @CTmagazine https://t.co/LmZJaOdFHO
Alternative Scriptures: Which Old Testament? https://t.co/ZisrCfHHYS Philip Jenkins, @anxious_bench
Should Donald Trump Be Removed from Office? | Thomas Kidd @TGC https://t.co/gRwqnyasNd
Thomas Kidd talks about 'Benjamin Franklin: The Religious Life of a Founding Father' with the @mattklewis podcast https://t.co/riLBUxxHZb

LAYING DOWN THE SWORD: Coming to Terms with Violent Scriptures – Lecture by Philip Jenkins


CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE VIDEO OF THIS LECTURE

Wednesday, February 8th, 2012
3:30 p.m.
Kayser Auditorium (for directions, click here)

Introduction by Dr. Elizabeth Davis, Executive Vice President and Provost. Philip Jenkins joins Baylor ISR as Distinguished Professor.

Special Announcement: As of January 1, 2012, Philip Jenkins, one of the world’s leading religion scholars joined Baylor University’s Institute for Studies of Religion.

Dr. Jenkins will lecture on his newest book, “Laying Down the Sword.” The Bible contains some extremely violent passages, in which God commands the annihilation of whole races and peoples. Through history, Christians and Jews have tried many strategies to deal with these alarming texts, while ordinary believers commonly ignore their existence. Yet as Christianity grows worldwide and encounters other faiths, the need to come to terms with our texts of terror becomes ever more urgent. And when we do make this effort, we see that even the grimmest-sounding scriptures can become the basis for a richer and deeper-rooted faith.