.@OsGuinness: A naked public square doesn't do justice to pluralism. A civil public square w #religiousfreedom is the answer @RFPGeorgetown
rt @fbeckwith New book by NT Wright from Baylor University Press - The Paul Debate http://t.co/2r352Bzvt1 @Baylor_Press
The Crisis in International Religious Freedom | #Baylor's David D. Corey | @firstthingsmag http://t.co/EQQj7sgjPy
Assisted Suicide and “Reasonable Medical Judgment” - #Baylor's @ayjay http://t.co/4d2BUhpSA7
Nov. 6 - ISR hosts #Baylor event on Pompeii and Early Christianity http://t.co/WsmO00XneB
Religious Freedom in the US Military http://t.co/rYZW8PkZpL @RFPGeorgetown
The Measure of a Woman: Donald Trump and St. Margaret’s Dragon http://t.co/9i8rljfTfD @bethallisonbarr at the Anxious Bench blog
W. SCOTT LAMB: Ronald Reagan, a Presbyterian pastor and a high school senior's project - Washington Times http://t.co/MIWZNCqPRx @RoRcast
Searching for the Political Messiah http://t.co/8B4rxWSEsr Thomas Kidd at the Anxious bench blog @PatheosEvang
Veil debate becomes big issue in Canada election, putting Conservatives into lead | World news | The Guardian http://t.co/kUg7xumOzA

LAYING DOWN THE SWORD: Coming to Terms with Violent Scriptures – Lecture by Philip Jenkins


Wednesday, February 8th, 2012
3:30 p.m.
Kayser Auditorium (for directions, click here)

Introduction by Dr. Elizabeth Davis, Executive Vice President and Provost. Philip Jenkins joins Baylor ISR as Distinguished Professor.

Special Announcement: As of January 1, 2012, Philip Jenkins, one of the world’s leading religion scholars joined Baylor University’s Institute for Studies of Religion.

Dr. Jenkins will lecture on his newest book, “Laying Down the Sword.” The Bible contains some extremely violent passages, in which God commands the annihilation of whole races and peoples. Through history, Christians and Jews have tried many strategies to deal with these alarming texts, while ordinary believers commonly ignore their existence. Yet as Christianity grows worldwide and encounters other faiths, the need to come to terms with our texts of terror becomes ever more urgent. And when we do make this effort, we see that even the grimmest-sounding scriptures can become the basis for a richer and deeper-rooted faith.